Why Is Maryland Called Little America?

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Why Is Maryland Called Little America
Maryland’s nicknames: “America In Miniature,” “Old Line State,” “Free State” – Maryland has been called “America in Miniature” because so much is packed into its 10,460 square miles of land and water. You can find just about any kind of natural feature here, except a desert.

  • That’s because water is almost everywhere in Maryland.
  • The “America In Miniature” title also applies to the role Maryland has played in our nation’s history, from the founding of the United States to the present.
  • And like our country, Maryland is home to ethnic groups of every origin.
  • Famous Marylanders include politicians, lawyers, painters, craftspeople, writers, health professionals and religious leaders.

Maryland was home to the first railroad, the first dental school and the first umbrella factory. And Maryland inventors gave us the gas light, the linotype machine and the refrigerator. Maryland is also called the “Old Line State” and “Free State.” “The Old Line” nickname was given during the Revolutionary War, when 400 soldiers in the First Maryland Regiment fought a British force of 10,000 and helped General George Washington’s army to escape.

Washington depended on the Maryland Line throughout the war, and the soldiers’ discipline and bravery earned Maryland its nickname. The name “Free State” was given in 1919, when Congress passed a law prohibiting the sale and use of alcohol. Marylanders opposed prohibition because they believed it violated their state’s rights.

The “Free State” nickname also represents Maryland’s long tradition of political freedom and religious tolerance.
Take a Tour of “America in Miniature” – September 4, 2019 Admiring the geology of Cunningham Falls State Park; by Joe Andrucyk If you look at a map of the United States, Maryland appears small—so small that depending on the map, you may hardly be able to see it at all. But when you’re here, the land of the Free State is actually quite expansive and diverse.

In the 1970s, National Geographic dubbed Maryland, “America in Miniature,” due to the fact that nearly every kind of terrain can be found here – from the sandy shores of the Atlantic Ocean and the expansive marshes of the Chesapeake Bay, to vast acres of farmland and the rocky Appalachian mountains.

In between, you’ll find the beautiful rolling hills of Maryland’s horse country, the spectacular sight of massive sunflower fields, and miles upon miles of water trails to travel by kayak or canoe, just like those who came before us. Across it all, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources oversees more than a half-million acres of public lands, including state forests, wildlife management areas and 75 state parks.

Those lands feature more than 900 miles of trails for biking, hiking and horseback riding, as well as unique water access and camping facilities. These places connect us with nature and help rejuvenate us. Everyone should take the opportunity to kick off the New Year with a First Day Hike, like I did this year at Patapsco Valley State Park.

Every January 1, more than 30 of our parks and public lands welcome thousands of hikers for guided and unguided tours as part of this national event. It’s a great commitment to both preserving our land and our own health. These lands also connect the people of Maryland to our past by conserving the state’s rich history, in places like Fort Frederick, built during the French and Indian War, Point Lookout, where American lookouts spotted British ships in two wars, and which later served as a prison camp in the Civil War, and of course the awe-inspiring story of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, as told in our park near her Dorchester County birthplace. Assisting in bear den survey in western Maryland; by Joe Andrucyk The mission of the Maryland Park Service is to manage our state’s natural, cultural, historical and recreational resources to provide for wise stewardship and enjoyment by citizens and visitors alike.

In support of that mission, our administration is proud to have increased funding for public lands and overseen an expansion of the land under our care and management. I’ve had the opportunity to watch those investments at work. And I’m committed to visiting all of our state parks and other public lands by the time I leave office.

What I’ve discovered above all else is the amazing dedication of the people who care for these lands—staff, volunteers and visitors who are absolutely devoted to their stewardship. More than 6,000 volunteers and 30 friends groups contribute more than 90,000 hours of service every year to the upkeep and enhancement of these lands.

When it comes to the love that people have for their land, there is nothing miniature about Maryland. I hope you’ll join me in discovering the amazing world that’s right in our own backyard. Lt. Governor Rutherford is taking on the Maryland state parks challenge! Track his progress as he visits Maryland’s public lands! Check out the interactive map online for updates and photos of “Rutherford’s Travels.” dnr.maryland.gov/publiclands Article by Boyd K.

Rutherford, Lieutenant Governor of Maryland. Appears in Vol.22, No.3 of the Maryland Natural Resource magazine, summer 2019. View Disclaimer in:

What is considered Little America?

Maryland’s nicknames: “America In Miniature,” “Old Line State,” “Free State” – Maryland has been called “America in Miniature” because so much is packed into its 10,460 square miles of land and water. You can find just about any kind of natural feature here, except a desert.

  • That’s because water is almost everywhere in Maryland.
  • The “America In Miniature” title also applies to the role Maryland has played in our nation’s history, from the founding of the United States to the present.
  • And like our country, Maryland is home to ethnic groups of every origin.
  • Famous Marylanders include politicians, lawyers, painters, craftspeople, writers, health professionals and religious leaders.
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Maryland was home to the first railroad, the first dental school and the first umbrella factory. And Maryland inventors gave us the gas light, the linotype machine and the refrigerator. Maryland is also called the “Old Line State” and “Free State.” “The Old Line” nickname was given during the Revolutionary War, when 400 soldiers in the First Maryland Regiment fought a British force of 10,000 and helped General George Washington’s army to escape.

Washington depended on the Maryland Line throughout the war, and the soldiers’ discipline and bravery earned Maryland its nickname. The name “Free State” was given in 1919, when Congress passed a law prohibiting the sale and use of alcohol. Marylanders opposed prohibition because they believed it violated their state’s rights.

The “Free State” nickname also represents Maryland’s long tradition of political freedom and religious tolerance.

What are 3 nicknames that Maryland has?

Maryland – Wikipedia U.S. state This article is about the U.S. state. For other uses, see, State in the United States Maryland State of Maryland : “”, “Free State”, “Little America”, “America in Miniature” :

  • (English: “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words”)
  • The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (“With Favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield”) Psalm 5:12

None (“” repealed in 2021) Map of the United States with Maryland highlighted CountryUnited StatesBefore statehoodApril 28, 1788 (7th) and areas

  • (combined)
  • (metro and urban)

Government • () • (R) • •

  • ()
  • (D)
  • 7 Democrats
  • 1 Republican

()Area • Total12,407 sq mi (32,133 km 2 ) • Land9,776 sq mi (25,314 km 2 ) • Water2,633 sq mi (6,819 km 2 ) 21% • RankDimensions • Length250 mi (400 km) • Width100 mi (200 km)Elevation 350 ft (110 m)Highest elevation ( ) 3,360 ft (1,024 m)Lowest elevation ( ) 0 ft (0 m)Population ( ) • Total6,177,224 • Rank • Density632/sq mi (244/km 2 ) • Rank • $87,063 • Income rank MarylanderLanguage • None (English, de facto ) () • Summer () () MD Md.Latitude37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ NLongitude75° 03′ W to 79° 29′ WWebsite Living insigniaInanimate insignia None. Formerly: “Maryland, My Maryland” by (1861), (adopted 1939, repealed 2021)

Released in 2000 Maryland ( : ( ) ) is a in the region of the United States. It shares borders with,, and the to its south and west; to its north; and and the to its east. is the largest city in the state, and the capital is, Among its occasional nicknames are, the Free State, and the State,

It is named after, the French-born queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland, who was known then in England as Mary. Before its coastline was explored by Europeans in the 16th century, Maryland was inhabited by several groups of Native Americans – mostly by and, to a lesser degree, and, As one of the original of England, Maryland was founded by, 1st Baron Baltimore, a convert who sought to provide a religious haven for Catholics persecuted in England.

In 1632, granted Lord Baltimore a, naming the colony after his wife, Henrietta Maria. Unlike the and, who rejected Catholicism in their settlements, Lord Baltimore envisioned a colony where people of different religious sects would coexist under the principle of,

Accordingly, in 1649 the Maryland General Assembly passed an, which enshrined this principle by penalizing anyone who “reproached” a fellow Marylander based on religious affiliation. Nevertheless, religious strife was common in the early years, and Catholics remained a minority, albeit in greater numbers than in any other English colony.

Maryland’s early settlements and population centers clustered around rivers and other waterways that empty into the Chesapeake Bay. Its economy was heavily and centered mostly on the cultivation of tobacco. Demand for cheap labor from Maryland colonists led to the importation of numerous and,

  • In 1760, Maryland’s current boundaries took form following the of a long-running border dispute with Pennsylvania.
  • Maryland was an active participant in the events leading up to the, and by 1776, its delegates signed the,
  • Many of its citizens subsequently played,
  • In 1790, the state ceded land for the establishment of the U.S.

capital of Although then a, Maryland during the, its strategic location giving it, After the Civil War, Maryland took part in the, driven by its seaports, railroad networks, and mass immigration from Europe. Since the 1940s, the state’s population has grown rapidly, to approximately six million residents, and it is among the most densely populated U.S.

States. As of 2015, Maryland had the of any state, owing in large part to its proximity to Washington, D.C., and a highly diversified economy spanning manufacturing, retail services, public administration, real estate, higher education, information technology, defense contracting, health care, and biotechnology.

The state’s central role in U.S. history is reflected by its hosting of some of the per capita. Sixteen of Maryland’s twenty-three counties, as well as the city of Baltimore, border the tidal waters of the and its many tributaries, which combined total more than 4,000 miles of shoreline.

Is Maryland mini America?

Posted by Dale Hawks, Maryland State Statistician, National Agricultural Statistics Service in Energy Conservation Feb 21, 2017 Maryland isn’t chicken to talk about its agriculture – it ranks 8th in broilers sold in the USA. Check back next Thursday as we spotlight another state’s results from the 2012 Census of Agriculture. The Census of Agriculture is the most complete account of U.S.

farms and ranches and the people who operate them. Every Thursday USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service will highlight new Census data and the power of the information to shape the future of American agriculture. The 2012 Census of Agriculture results are out, and it is clear that here in Maryland, we have a little bit of everything.

Although our state is small, the geography is diverse, providing suitable environments for a variety of agricultural commodities. From the Atlantic shore, to mountainous terrain, and from a diversity of livestock to an array of crops, Maryland truly is America in miniature.

  • In the Free State, about 69 percent of land in farms is cropland.
  • We have 435,646 acres of corn for grain, 1,936 acres of oats for grain, 475,615 acres of soybeans for beans, and 210,354 acres of wheat for grain.
  • In fact, 31.5 percent of the total market value of agriculture products sold comes from grains, oilseeds, dry beans, and dry peas.
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We also have almost every fruit and vegetable in the Census. The sandy environment near the shoreline is conducive to growing watermelons, of which we have 3,278 acres; and, the higher altitudes provide opportunities for producing grapes and peaches, of which we have 681 acres and 999 acres respectively.

  • Furthermore, we have over 4,000 acres devoted to growing snap beans, and over 2,000 acres each devoted to growing green lima beans and green peas.
  • We also have almost 2,000 acres of apples, as well as of cucumbers and pickles.
  • To top it off, we even have a prevalence of nursery, greenhouse, floriculture, and sod, which make up 9% of the total value of agriculture products sold.

In addition to crops, the diversity of animals in Maryland agriculture contributes to our mini America. We have horses and ponies, cattle and calves, and hogs and pigs, but poultry makes the biggest statement. We rank eighth in the nation for the number of broilers sold at 304.7 million, and 40.6 percent of the market value of Maryland agriculture products sold comes from poultry and eggs.

Maryland, like the nation as a whole, exhibits a diversity of agricultural practices to complement the variety of products. For example, we have 91 farms that in 2012 produced almost $12 million in organic products, up about 6.4 million since 2007. Frederick County alone accounts for 20% of those farms.

In addition, 539 farms market products directly to retail outlets. We also have 416 farms with renewable energy producing systems. The top three systems are solar panels, geoexchange systems, and biodiesel. As you can see, we really do have a taste of everything here in Maryland, so our nickname, America in miniature, is quite fitting.

What is a person from Maryland called?

Maryland – People who live in Maryland are called Marylanders and Marylandians.

  • What is the most common last name in Maryland?

    This photo taken Nov.9, 2010, shows Emily Goodmann, a doctoral student who is doing her dissertation on the history of the telephone book. Ancestry, with the help of the white pages, researched the most common surnames in each state. AP file An Ancestry study has found the “most common surnames by state.” With help from the white pages, the popular genealogy site found one last name was most common nationwide: Smith.

    • Other popular surnames include Johnson, Williams, Brown, Jones and Miller.
    • Most popular last names changed depending on region, according to the Houston Chronicle, although Smith was found in all regions, along with Johnson and Williams.
    • There were two states with all Latino last names in the top three: California and New Mexico.

    Texas and Arizona also had Latino surnames in the mix. Hawaii had a unique top three. And Massachusetts’ significant Irish population was represented in one of its top three surnames. Here’s the breakdown:

    State #1 most common name #2 most common name #3 most common name
    Alabama Smith Williams Johnson
    Alaska Smith Johnson Williams
    Arizona Smith Johnson Garcia
    Arkansas Smith Williams Johnson
    California Garcia Hernandez Lopez
    Colorado Smith Johnson Martinez
    Connecticut Smith Johnson Brown
    Delaware Smith Johnson Brown
    Florida Smith Williams Johnson
    Georgia Smith Williams Johnson
    Hawaii Lee Wong Kim
    Idaho Smith Johnson Anderson
    Illinois Smith Johnson Williams
    Indiana Smith Miller Johnson
    Iowa Smith Williams Johnson
    Kansas Smith Johnson Miller
    Kentucky Smith Johnson Jones
    Louisiana Williams Smith Johnson
    Maine Smith Brown Johnson
    Maryland Smith Johnson Jones
    Massachusetts Smith Johnson Sullivan
    Michigan Smith Johnson Williams
    Minnesota Johnson Anderson Nelson
    Mississippi Smith Williams Johnson
    Missouri Smith Johnson Williams
    Montana Smith Johnson Anderson
    Nebraska Johnson Smith Miller
    Nevada Smith Johnson Garcia
    New Hampshire Smith Brown Johnson
    New Jersey Smith Williams Johnson
    New Mexico Martinez Garcia Chavez
    New York Smith Williams Brown
    North Carolina Smith Williams Brown
    North Dakota Johnson Anderson Olson
    Ohio Smith Miller Johnson
    Oklahoma Smith Johnson Williams
    Oregon Smith Johnson Miller
    Pennsylvania Smith Miller Williams
    Rhode Island Smith Brown Johnson
    South Carolina Smith Williams Brown
    South Dakota Johnson Anderson Smith
    Tennessee Smith Johnson Jones
    Texas Garcia Smith Martinez
    Utah Smith Johnson Anderson
    Vermont Smith Brown Johnson
    Virginia Smith Johnson Jones
    Washington Smith Johnson Anderson
    West Virginia Smith Miller Johnson
    Wisconsin Johnson Smith Anderson
    Wyoming Smith Johnson Miller

    This story was originally published December 3, 2017 1:52 PM.

    Are there Nigerians in Maryland?

    History of Africans in Baltimore

    Part of a series on

    Aspect of history The city of, includes a significant population. Immigrants from many African countries have settled in Baltimore, including,,,,,,,,,, and, Nigerians, Ghanaians, and Ethiopians are the largest African immigrant groups residing in Baltimore.

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    Why is Maryland called America in miniature?

    Maryland’s nicknames: “America In Miniature,” “Old Line State,” “Free State” – Maryland has been called “America in Miniature” because so much is packed into its 10,460 square miles of land and water. You can find just about any kind of natural feature here, except a desert.

    1. That’s because water is almost everywhere in Maryland.
    2. The “America In Miniature” title also applies to the role Maryland has played in our nation’s history, from the founding of the United States to the present.
    3. And like our country, Maryland is home to ethnic groups of every origin.
    4. Famous Marylanders include politicians, lawyers, painters, craftspeople, writers, health professionals and religious leaders.

    Maryland was home to the first railroad, the first dental school and the first umbrella factory. And Maryland inventors gave us the gas light, the linotype machine and the refrigerator. Maryland is also called the “Old Line State” and “Free State.” “The Old Line” nickname was given during the Revolutionary War, when 400 soldiers in the First Maryland Regiment fought a British force of 10,000 and helped General George Washington’s army to escape.

    • Washington depended on the Maryland Line throughout the war, and the soldiers’ discipline and bravery earned Maryland its nickname.
    • The name “Free State” was given in 1919, when Congress passed a law prohibiting the sale and use of alcohol.
    • Marylanders opposed prohibition because they believed it violated their state’s rights.

    The “Free State” nickname also represents Maryland’s long tradition of political freedom and religious tolerance.

    Why is Maryland called the Free State?

    Maryland’s nicknames: “America In Miniature,” “Old Line State,” “Free State” – Maryland has been called “America in Miniature” because so much is packed into its 10,460 square miles of land and water. You can find just about any kind of natural feature here, except a desert.

    • That’s because water is almost everywhere in Maryland.
    • The “America In Miniature” title also applies to the role Maryland has played in our nation’s history, from the founding of the United States to the present.
    • And like our country, Maryland is home to ethnic groups of every origin.
    • Famous Marylanders include politicians, lawyers, painters, craftspeople, writers, health professionals and religious leaders.

    Maryland was home to the first railroad, the first dental school and the first umbrella factory. And Maryland inventors gave us the gas light, the linotype machine and the refrigerator. Maryland is also called the “Old Line State” and “Free State.” “The Old Line” nickname was given during the Revolutionary War, when 400 soldiers in the First Maryland Regiment fought a British force of 10,000 and helped General George Washington’s army to escape.

    • Washington depended on the Maryland Line throughout the war, and the soldiers’ discipline and bravery earned Maryland its nickname.
    • The name “Free State” was given in 1919, when Congress passed a law prohibiting the sale and use of alcohol.
    • Marylanders opposed prohibition because they believed it violated their state’s rights.

    The “Free State” nickname also represents Maryland’s long tradition of political freedom and religious tolerance.

    Why is Maryland called the old line?

    Maryland’s nicknames: “America In Miniature,” “Old Line State,” “Free State” – Maryland has been called “America in Miniature” because so much is packed into its 10,460 square miles of land and water. You can find just about any kind of natural feature here, except a desert.

    That’s because water is almost everywhere in Maryland. The “America In Miniature” title also applies to the role Maryland has played in our nation’s history, from the founding of the United States to the present. And like our country, Maryland is home to ethnic groups of every origin. Famous Marylanders include politicians, lawyers, painters, craftspeople, writers, health professionals and religious leaders.

    Maryland was home to the first railroad, the first dental school and the first umbrella factory. And Maryland inventors gave us the gas light, the linotype machine and the refrigerator. Maryland is also called the “Old Line State” and “Free State.” “The Old Line” nickname was given during the Revolutionary War, when 400 soldiers in the First Maryland Regiment fought a British force of 10,000 and helped General George Washington’s army to escape.

    Washington depended on the Maryland Line throughout the war, and the soldiers’ discipline and bravery earned Maryland its nickname. The name “Free State” was given in 1919, when Congress passed a law prohibiting the sale and use of alcohol. Marylanders opposed prohibition because they believed it violated their state’s rights.

    The “Free State” nickname also represents Maryland’s long tradition of political freedom and religious tolerance.

    What is the state insect of Maryland?

    Environment – Maryland joined with neighboring states during the end of the 20th century to improve the health of the, The bay’s aquatic life and seafood industry have been threatened by development and by fertilizer and livestock waste entering the bay.

    1. In 2007, Forbes.com rated Maryland as the fifth “Greenest” state in the country, behind three of the and Vermont.
    2. Maryland ranks 40th in total energy consumption nationwide, and it managed less toxic waste per capita than all but six states in 2005.
    3. In April 2007, Maryland joined the (RGGI) — a regional initiative, formed by all the Northeastern states, Washington, D.C., and three Canadian provinces, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    In March 2017, Maryland became the first state with proven gas reserves to ban fracking by passing a law against it. Vermont has such a law, but no shale gas, and New York has such a ban, though it was made by executive order.