Where To Buy Beer In Maryland?

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Where To Buy Beer In Maryland
Where to buy beer in maryland? – Beer and wine may be purchased in grocery shops and convenience stores in Maryland between the hours of 8:00 am and 11:00 pm. Each day of the week, with the exception of Sundays. service starts at 8 am and lasts till 2 am in restaurants and pubs.

Each day of the week, with the exception of Sundays. The only day other than Sunday on which alcohol cannot be purchased before noon is Sunday. Forget about walking into Walmart with your shopping list and hoping to find wine, beer, or spirits. According to the company’s policy on the sale of alcoholic beverages, for instance, some people are prohibited from purchasing alcohol.

Walmart enforces a minimum age of 21 for the purchasing of alcoholic beverages. The sale of beer requires a license, with the exception of the time from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m. on Sundays, when such sales are not permitted in stores. Restaurants and bars may start serving customers anywhere from six in the morning until two in the morning.

Can you buy beer in a grocery store in Maryland?

Daily Record business reporter February 21, 2022 Where To Buy Beer In Maryland A bill sponsored in the House of Delegates by Del. Lily Qi and in the Senate by Sen. Cory McCray would allow voters to choose whether grocery stores could begin selling beer and wine. (The Daily Record / Maximilian Franz) The latest push to get wine and beer in Maryland grocery stores could involve putting the measure up to a vote in November.

  • Del. Lily Qi, D-Montgomery, and Sen.
  • Cory McCray, D-Baltimore, have filed HB506 and SB603, respectively, bills that would put a referendum to lift Maryland’s blanket ban on beer and wine in grocery stores, in the form of an amendment to the state’s constitution, on November’s ballot.
  • Marylanders have been unable to purchase beer and wine in grocery stores since 1978, when a law was passed banning the sale of alcohol in supermarkets and chain stores, with a handful of exemptions.

But several polls have shown that many of the state’s residents want that to change. In 2020, for example, a poll conducted by Marylanders for Better Beer and Wine Laws indicated that more than two-thirds of the state’s residents are in favor of the sale of beer and wine in grocery stores.

The duo of lawmakers previously worked together on a similar bill during the 2021 General Assembly session. Last year’s bill, which Qi withdrew after receiving an unfavorable vote in the House Alcoholic Beverages Subcommittee, would have allowed grocers who opened and operated stores in food deserts to sell beer and wine in order to incentivize them to open in higher-need areas.

Although the bill had supporters, including the Maryland Retailers Association, which has advocated for supermarkets to be allowed to sell beer and wine for years, it was criticized for potentially taking business away from liquor stores and bringing more alcohol into poor communities.

  1. With the new iteration of the bill, which was heard in the House Economic Matters Committee on Monday, Qi and McCray hope to let the voters themselves have the ultimate say on the matter.
  2. Let voters have a choice, just like (with) cannabis,” Qi said, referring to a bill currently making its way through the General Assembly that could put a referendum on legalizing recreational marijuana on the ballot this November.

Qi said that leveraging the sale of wine and beer to persuade more grocers to operate in underserved areas is still a central goal of the legislation. However, the details of how that would work aren’t included in this bill. Those incentives, along with other regulations and policies related to the amendment, would have to be hashed out by the General Assembly and local liquor boards at a later date.

If voters ended up approving the amendment, grocers will be able to get beer and wine licenses beginning on July 1, 2024, giving lawmakers just under two years to work out those details. The amendment does currently contain language that would require liquor boards to prioritize licenses for stores “located in geographic areas that have a demonstrated lack of affordable healthy food options.” The delegate hopes that this bill will be more popular among the county liquor boards than its previous iteration, as it gives them the freedom and flexibility to implement the new policy as they see fit.

“Some of them are more conservative in terms of any changes and they don’t want the state to tell them what they can or cannot do. But this is a very enabling framework,” she said. ” I don’t know why they wouldn’t welcome that flexibility we’re giving them more tools to work with.” Beyond her goal of bringing more grocery stores to the state’s food deserts, Qi said she simply considers it common sense legislation that would bring Maryland in line with the rest of the nation.

  1. Maryland is one of only four states in the United States that doesn’t allow the sale of beer, and one of only 11 that doesn’t allow the sale of wine, in supermarkets, according to the Food Industry Association Alcohol Fact Book Database.
  2. This bill allows the voters to have a say in this matter that affects their everyday life,” she said.

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Can you buy beer in gas stations in Maryland?

Maryland Beer and Wine Laws – Maryland is one of a few states that prohibits the purchase of beer and wine in grocery stores. Current law restricts the sale to stand-alone, non-chain stores, with licensing restricted to Maryland residents. Wine can be purchased at convenience locations in neighboring states like Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Washington D.C.

When can you buy beer in Maryland?

Retail: 6 a.m. – 2 a.m., except Sunday. Bars: 6 a.m. – 2 a.m. Beer and wine.

Can you buy alcohol in a gas station Maryland?

Nearly every retail store and gas station will sell beer. There are certain hours it can’t be purchased though. However, if you want liquor, you have to go to the state liquor store.

Does 711 sell alcohol in Maryland?

Despite the varying rules and regulations, 711 sells alcohol in all the states it has a store. As a result, the convenience store knows the local rules to sell alcoholic beverages in every state.

Does Maryland Wawa sell beer?

Does Wawa sell beer in Maryland? – Yes, you can purchase Wawa’s beers in Maryland.

Does CVS sell alcohol in Maryland?

Short answer: Yes, CVS convenience stores sell alcohol per the laws and regulations of the state and local municipality where the store is located. Does CVS Sell Alcohol?

How is alcohol sold in Maryland?

Somerset County: – A person eighteen (18) years of age or older may serve any alcoholic beverage while serving as a food service waiter or waitress in a restaurant. (b) No person under the age of twenty-one (21) may act as a bartender, barmaid, waiter or waitress in any solely bar or lounge related capacity.

  • C) No person under the age of twenty-one (21) may act as a package goods clerk.
  • A person sixteen (16) years of age or older may work as a stock clerk stocking alcoholic beverages.
  • Alcohol may be Sold: Monday through Saturday, from 6 a.m. to 2 a.m.
  • Sunday, from 12:30 p.m.
  • To midnight if food is available for purchase on the premises.

The license holder may not sell beer, wine, or liquor at a bar or counter on Sunday. Contact your Liquor Board Office for any differences according to your type of License

Does Target sell alcohol in Maryland?

Yes. According to an employee of the Salisbury Target, they do indeed sell wine.

Why can’t grocery stores sell alcohol in Maryland?

‘Stars have aligned’ for change in Maryland – Giant Food has 96 stores in Maryland but only three sell beer and wine, Jeffrey Pygott, Giant Food’s category manager of beer and wine, wrote in an email. That’s due to a 1978 law that banned chain stores and supermarkets from selling alcohol. Where To Buy Beer In Maryland Beer and wine at the Giant Food in Maryland’s White Oak Shopping Center. Catherine Douglas Moran/Grocery Dive Advocates of changing Maryland’s laws say it’s inconvenient and confusing for shoppers. The Maryland Retailers Association and Marylanders for Better Beer & Wine Laws (MBBWL), a group of consumers, producers, retailers, distributors and restaurateurs started in 2005, have been rallying support behind lifting the restrictions.

The Maryland Retailers Association launched a website last year to inform people about the issue and has been asking for supporters to call legislators and sign a petition. The MBBWL is also asking people to contact elected officials and to call chain stores to voice support for expanded alcohol choice.

“We’ve been polling it for years, and the number just keeps going up support-wise in our state,” said Cailey Locklair, president of the Maryland Retailers Association, noting that roughly 70% of respondents consistently support changing the alcohol laws.

A study done by economic research firm John Dunham and Associates and commissioned by the Maryland Retailers Association, meanwhile, estimated that opening up beer and wine sales to more food retailers in Maryland would bump overall sales by nearly $193 million, add 760 new jobs and result in $24.1 million of additional tax revenues.

But proponents face strong opposition from package stores claiming competition with grocers would lead to mom and pop liquor stores closing. Some legislators have raised concerns about the possible impacts on alcohol abuse and underage drinking. Supporters are also up against the distributors that have a “stranglehold” on alcohol variety and pricing, Locklair said.

  • Locklair and MBBWL President Adam Borden said they are hopeful the new faces in the Maryland General Assembly will spark changes.
  • Following the 2018 election, 60 of the 188 members of the Maryland General Assembly were newcomers, and in 2020 leadership changed in the Senate and House.
  • The stars have aligned on this issue,” Locklair said.

The push for new regulations will still be challenging, however. Two Democrats who joined the state legislature in 2019 proposed legislation this year that would entice grocers to open in food deserts by allowing them to sell beer and wine. The House version of the bill received an unfavorable recommendation from the alcoholic beverages subcommittee, slashing the legislation’s chances of advancing, Borden said.

By mid-March, the House version of the bill was withdrawn. “It’s not uncommon that legislation takes two or three years to eventually become law,” Borden said. There are two possible paths forward: Politicians could take up the issue again in a future legislative session or the legislature could decide to put the issue on the ballot.

Locklair said proposed bills are the “best bet” to tackle alcohol sales, noting that the referendum process is more challenging for the issue. In the meantime, Giant Food is waiting for the day it can start selling beer and wine at more of its stores, Pygott said.

Do supermarkets sell liquor in Maryland?

By Emma Craig 3/16/2021 – Many consumers wonder why they may purchase beer and wine from grocery stores in other states but cannot do so in Maryland. Currently, 47 states and the District of Columbia allow grocery stores to sell beer while 40 states and the District of Columbia allow them to sell wine.

  • According to one report, 98% of Americans can buy beer and 85% can purchase wine in grocery stores.
  • Grocery stores in Maryland may soon be able to sell beer and wine to consumers.
  • During this 2021 Session, the Maryland General Assembly is considering a Bill, “Alcoholic Beverages – Class A Licenses – Retail Grocery Establishments (the Health Food Accountability Act of 2021)” ( House Bill 996 and Senate Bill 763 ), which would allow retail grocery stores to hold beer or beer and wine licenses.

Currently, alcohol distribution in Maryland is constrained by a 1978 law that prohibits grocery and other stores from obtaining alcohol licenses, with some exceptions, Under the current Maryland Alcoholic Beverages Code, a local liquor board may not issue a beer, wine, or liquor license to a chain store, a supermarket, or a discount house.

  • However, establishments that held a beer, wine, or liquor license prior to the enactment of this law were exempted from this prohibition, allowing a few retail grocers in Maryland to sell beer and wine to consumers.
  • For example, three grocery stores in Montgomery County may sell beer and wine because they were licensed to do so before the law changed.
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Under the proposed legislation, a local liquor board would be empowered to issue beer and wine licenses to retail grocers that carries at least six of the seven following items: fresh produce, fresh meat, dairy products, canned foods, frozen foods, dry goods, and nonalcoholic beverages.

Additionally, the legislation would require a local liquor board to issue a beer and/or wine license to such establishments that are located in priority funding areas, which includes municipalities, areas inside the Washington and Baltimore Beltways, and areas designated as enterprise zones, neighborhood revitalization areas, heritage areas, and existing industrial land.

In a committee hearing on House Bill 996, Delegate Lily Qi, who is sponsoring the legislation, explained that the bill was intended to address food insecurities in the State, based on priority funding areas. Grocery stores operate on thin profit margins due to high competition in the industry, which keeps supermarkets from entering remote rural regions and dense urban areas because of heavy reliance on government subsidy programs.

  • Delegate Qi believes that the bill would encourage grocers to move into these food insecure areas to offer fresh food options by allowing them to improve their profit margins by offering beer and wine to consumers.
  • In addition to addressing food insecurity, the proposed legislation would satisfy consumer wishes.

Data from a poll released by Marylanders for Better Beer and Wine Laws (“MBBWL”) indicates that Marylanders favor allowing chain stores to sell alcohol by a 2-1 ratio. The poll found that 71% of Marylanders approve of beer sales in grocery stores and 73% support wine sales in grocery stores.

While only 56% of Marylanders think grocery stores should be able to sell liquor, this is comparable to the 52% of Marylanders that favored legalization of table gaming, which was legalized in Maryland in 2012, and the 57% that support legalization of recreational marijuana, which is also being considered this legislative session.

While consumers are largely receptive to the expansion of liquor licenses to grocery stores, specific interest groups are avidly in favor of or opposed to the legislation. MBBWL and the Maryland Retailers Association (MRA) are vocally supportive of the legislation.

  1. Supporters offer a number of justifications for the expansion.
  2. First, they claim that the legislation will help balance Maryland’s budget, which is especially salient during concerns over the pandemic’s impact on the State budget.
  3. MBBWL estimates that the expansion can generate $200 million in economic benefit to the State.

A prior 2012 study had also projected that the expansion would generate significant economic gain for the State, almost $100 million in economic benefit and an additional 500 jobs. Supporters also argue that the expansion would be more convenient for consumers and would improve choice and cost,

  1. Consumers would be able to make one stop for beer, wine, and groceries, which is attractive given contact dangers with the coronavirus.
  2. Additionally, expanding suppliers will offer more choices to consumers and could drive down costs.
  3. MBBWL projects that a popular bottle of wine at a chain store would be 33% less than the price at an independent liquor store in the State.

Those opposing the legislation largely argue that the expansion would harm independent liquor store owners, many of which are small business owners. The same 2012 study that MBBWL relied on years ago projected that liquor stores would lose $13,624 in beer sales revenue and $3,489 in revenue from wine sales.

This year, the Fiscal and Policy Note for House Bill 996 noted that while “mall business grocery stores and convenience stores are likely to benefit meaningfully from the authority to sell alcoholic beverages, small businesses that are licensed to sell alcoholic beverages under current law are likely to lose business as grocery stores and convenience stores begin to sell alcoholic beverages as well.” The Distilled Spirits Council of the United States has testified on other states’ legislation that allowing grocery stores to sell wine would put independent stores out of business and threaten local jobs because foot traffic to those small independent liquor stores would be reduced.

In testimony to the Maryland General Assembly, it also noted that after Tennessee made a similar change in 2016, sales for independent stores went down roughly 9% and the state lost $3.6 million in tax revenue. In addition, some opponents dispute that the expansion of licenses would benefit Maryland given that most chain grocery stores are out-of-state entities, whereas independent liquor stores in the State are locally owned,

For example, states can sometimes miss out on taxes from businesses that benefit from tax shelters in other states.) Opponents also question that the expansion would increase jobs in the State, doubting that the grocers would need to hire additional staff to handle the product. The expansion could also impact other industries in addition to liquor stores.

For instance, liquor stores may end up selling less spirits and local craft beer and wine due to less foot traffic if consumers choose to purchase their beer and wine from bigger chain stores. Since those stores could not offer liquor and may not offer as varied a selection of local beer and wine, distilleries and local craft breweries and wineries could experience fewer sales of their product.

MBBWL disputes these opponents’ arguments that the expansion of licenses would hurt small liquor stores or negatively impact State revenue. For instance, MBBWL points out that only one small liquor store went out of business in Oklahoma in 2018 while the alcohol regulatory authority issued thousands more licenses.

They also point to Massachusetts, which saw an increase of $16.9 million in economic activity and an additional 150 jobs after expanding beer and wine licenses to grocery stores. While both sides present persuasive arguments and data, those arguments should be analyzed critically as each side is promoting its own interests and is not entirely neutral.

For instance, some have criticized Maryland’s prohibition against grocery stores selling alcohol as an intrusion into consumers’ “freedom to purchase beverage alcohol.” However, a state has the power to regulate alcohol in a way that serves the interests of its citizens, without overtly contradicting the federal government’s commercial interests.

That power is often delegated to local jurisdictions to best serve the localized needs of their constituents. So, while the regulation might be inconvenient to consumers, it is something the State may maintain for the health and benefit of the State. With conflicting arguments and data, the General Assembly will have to weigh the proposals and consider any resulting benefit and harm to the State.

The interests the General Assembly has to balance are important. On one hand, the data clearly indicates that consumers support the availability of beer and wine in retail grocery stores. On the other hand, small businesses, including independent liquor stores, support Maryland’s economy and could be hurt by the alcohol license expansion.

To address this latter concern, the General Assembly could consider geographic protective measures to protect current liquor stores from stifling chain store competition. Aside from consumer convenience, both sides dispute the economic impact for the State, with both presenting conflicting case studies.

  1. If Maryland chooses to expand these licenses, it needs to ensure it can effectively capture economic revenue, especially from out-of-state chain corporations, through licensing and taxes,
  2. In short, the General Assembly must weigh the interests of constituent consumers, local business owners, the State budget, and the likelihood that the bill will improve food deserts when deciding whether to allow retail grocers to sell beer and wine in the State.

The General Assembly session will end on April 12, 2021, You can follow the legislation on mgaleg.maryland.gov by searching for HB 996 and SB 763.

Does Costco in Maryland sell alcohol?

Buy your booze at Costco and save! If you live in one of the 18 states where the sale of distilled spirits (aka hard liquor) is controlled by the state then you are stuck purchasing your liquor from state sanctioned ABC stores and which means you’re stuck paying their outrageous prices.

  • But if you live in any other state, then you have the privilege of being able to purchase your favorite booze from retailers like grocery stores, convenience stores and big box stores like Costco.
  • Because both the state of Maryland and the state of Virginia are unfortunately so called ‘control states,’ Costcos in MD & VA cannot sell hard liquor.

Virginia Costcos can sell beer and wine but Maryland Costcos can’t sell any alcohol. For years Marylanders & Virginians in the DC Metro Area have suffered, but the opening of the first in Nov 2012, changed everything, Because the District doesn’t control the sale of liquor the same way MD & VA do, they allow retailers, like Costco, to sell hard liquor, which means you can purchase not only Costco size bottles of your favorite booze, but you can enjoy Costco size prices too! Check out these price comparisons of some name brand spirits: on the left side of each photo is the retail price in a Northern VA ABC store and on the right side is the Costco price in the Washington DC warehouse for the exact same size bottle.

  • Bombay Sapphire Gin: a 1.75L bottle retails for $53.95 but Costco sells the same bottle for only $29.39.
  • The Costco price is an astounding 45% cheaper than the retail price! You save $24.56!! Belvedere Vodka: a 1.75L bottle retails for $59.95 but Costco sells the same bottle for only $42.89.
  • The Costco price is 28% less expensive than the retail price, which saves you over $17! Malibu Caribbean Rum: a 1.75L bottle retails for $29.95 but Costco sells the same bottle for only $18.89; that’s a 36% savings off the retail price! Even the ABC store sale price of $26.95 can’t compete with the Costco sale price of $15.69, which is an even greater savings at 41% less than the retail price! Knob Creek Kentucky Bourbon: a 1.75L bottle retails for $69.90 while Costco sells the same bottle for $49.99.

The Costco price is 28% less than the retail price! Kahlua Coffee Liqueur: a 1.75L bottle retails for $47.95 while Costco sells the same bottle for $35.89. The Costco price is 25% less than the retail price! Bailey’s Irish Cream: a 1.75L bottle retails for $50.95 while Costco sells the same bottle for $39.99.

  1. The Costco price is 21% less than the retail price! Tanqueray Gin: a 1.75L bottle retails for $49.95 while Costco sells the same bottle for $28.99.
  2. The Costco price is 41% less than the retail price! Grey Goose Vodka: a 1.75L bottle retails for $69.90 while Costco sells the same bottle for $45.89.
  3. The Costco price is 34% less than the retail price! Beefeater Gin: a 1.75L bottle retails for $41.90 while Costco sells the same bottle for $25.99.

The Costco price is 37% less than the retail price! Johnny Walker Red Whisky: a 1.75L bottle retails for $49.90 while Costco sells the same bottle for only $28.89. The Costco price is 42% less than the retail price! Patron Silver Tequila: a 1.75L bottle retails for $103.90 while Costco sells the same bottle for $79.99.

  • The Costco price is 23% less than the retail price! Dewar’s Special Reserve 12 Year old Scotch: a 1.75L bottle retails for $79.95 while Costco sells the same bottle for $49.89.
  • The Costco price is 37% less than the retail price! Ciroc Vodka: a 1.75L bottle retails for $71.95 while Costco sells the same bottle for $45.89.

The Costco price is 36% off the retail price! From this sample you can clearly see how Costco can save you anywhere from 21% to 45% off the retail price of your favorite distilled spirits. And if you’re stocking up for a big event there’s virtually no risk because Costco allows you to return any unused, unopened bottles as long as you have your receipt and all original packaging, (the same goes for unopened cases of beer too), whereas most ABC stores will charge you a restocking fee to return merchandise and some put a cap on how much you can return if they allow returns at all.

  1. Of course, that’s not all, Costco also has its own line of fabulous Kirkland Signature distilled spirits you can enjoy at a fraction of the cost of their brand name competitors.
  2. Check out this selection of KS brand hard liquor also from the DC warehouse.
  3. Irkland Signature 18 year old Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky (item #823871): Kirkland Signature Reposado Tequila (item #774371): Kirkland Signature Silver Tequila (item #888117): Kirkland Signature Vodka (item #999910): Kirkland Signature Canadian Whisky (item #888870): Kirkland Signature Small Batch Kentucky Bourbon (item #888863): And finally, for you enthusiasts & collectors, check out the Kirkland Signature Glenlivet Distillery 40 year old Single Malt Scotch Whisky (item #746526).
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You can read more about this limited quantity item in the magazine. Costco also carries a wide variety of top rated wines (including Champagne) and beers, including their own Kirkland Signature wines & beers, so the next time you need booze for a barbecue, a party, a wedding or even just for the weekend hop in your car and make a trip to Costco.

  • And if you live in the DC metro area make a trip to the DC warehouse.
  • DISCLAIMER 20 Aug 2015*** It has been brought to my attention that the state of Virginia has a law decreeing ” No more than one gallon of alcoholic beverages (or the metric equivalent) may be brought into Virginia from outside the Commonwealth, excepting shipments to the commission or its licensees.

” This, for the purposes of this blog post, essentially means that it is illegal to purchase more than five (5) 750 ml bottles of liquor in DC (or any other state) and bring them back into Virginia- even if they are for your own personal consumption.

I have also heard that Virginia employees ABC agents monitor liquor stores in the District specifically looking for people with Virginia license plates who purchase large quantities of alcohol (like several cases) and bring them back into Virginia. Apparently, once these consumers cross back into Virginia the ABC agents can stop the driver, seize the alcohol, impound the vehicle and fine the driver.

With that being said, Costco is a lot more than just a liquor store so if I (as VA resident) go to the DC Costco warehouse and purchase several bottles of liquor in a single trip along with my other groceries and household items (which I have done many times) I feel like I am probably fine.

However, now that this state law has been brought to my attention I will certainly think twice about going to the DC Costco Warehouse and purchasing an entire cart full of nothing but alcohol for my next party. I am not a lawyer and thus not an expert on the law and I cannot provide legal advice, but I certainly do not want to encourage anyone to break the law.

Please use the links below AND do your own research to ensure you understand your states alcoholic beverage laws and use your own judgement before purchasing alcohol outside of your state of residence:

  1. (It should also be noted that beer and wine are covered under separate VA state laws that allow you to legally purchase two cases of wine or two cases of beer (or one case of each) outside of the Commonwealth, but since Virginia Costcos already sell beer and wine, if you are a Virginia resident you should be able to purchase what you need without traveling out of state.)
  2. Marylanders- I’m sorry but I know nothing of your alcohol laws except that I have heard they are even more ridiculous than the Virginia alcohol laws and according to Tom Bridge from the state of Maryland basically just wants you to stay completely sober.
  3. End of Disclaimer.

Thanks so much for reading my blog! Until next time, t he Costco Connoisseur #GoingToAllTheCostcos P.S. Follow me on Twitter! Follow me on Instagram! : Buy your booze at Costco and save!

Can you buy beer in MD on Sunday?

Can you buy alcohol on Sunday? – Laws regarding the purchase of alcohol on Sunday can vary by county in Maryland. Where permitted, hours vary slightly, but typically fall within the hours of 8:00am – 11:00pm, with individual stores varying hours at their discretion.

Can you buy beer in grocery stores in DC?

When and Where to Buy Alcohol: D.C. Sales Outlets and Hours – Because D.C. is not a state, it has some loopholes other places don’t have. For instance, while bars and restaurants in every state have to purchase their alcoholic beverages from a wholesaler, in D.C.

they can buy those products directly from breweries and distilleries. That’s bad news for the middlemen but good news for craft beer lovers, who will find no shortage of local beers distributed directly by small breweries to stores, restaurants, and bars. Unlike many states, D.C. doesn’t have old Sunday “blue laws” on its books.

There are virtually no restrictions on Sunday, when you can purchase liquor served at licensed restaurants and bars from 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. You can also buy it at grocery and liquor stores every day of the week, including Sundays, from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. While grocery stores only sell beer and wine, spirits are widely available at packaged liquor stores.

Can you buy alcohol in MD on Sunday?

COUNTY RULES – Since the laws are so numerous and complicated, I focus this analysis on the two counties closest to DC: Montgomery County and Prince George’s County. Montgomery County is an “alcohol controlled” or “control district” county, meaning that the county has a heavy hand in regulating the distribution and sale of alcohol.

  • Off-premise (non-bar and restaurant) liquor sales may only be conducted at county-owned and operated stores.
  • Beer and wine sales may be made by licensed retail accounts, including four (and only four) grocery stores whose licenses were in place before the laws came into effect the state of Maryland changed the law about alcohol sales in grocery stores,

The four chains who were grandfathered in after the state law changed included Magruder’s (whose Gaithersburg location has closed, but the chain maintains the right to transfer the license to another location if one exists), Balducci’s (formerly Sutton Place), Rodman’s, and Roots Market in Olney.

  • Non-county-owned licensed retail outlets can also sell beer and wine in Montgomery County.
  • When sales are “off-premise,” a consumer purchases a six-pack or a couple of 22oz bombers to take home.
  • Typically, a brewery sells their beer to a distributor, who then sells the beer to a store or bar, who then sells it to a consumer.

In essence, in alcohol-control counties, rather than a distributor alone being the second part of the three-tier system (i.e., the brewery, the distributor, the store), the county effectively acts as a secondary distributor and receives product from the distributor, who then sells to a retailer.

For a detailed discussion of this, take a look at, Very recently, however, breweries possessing a micro-brewery license have been allowed to self-distribute in Montgomery County – meaning that the brewery is permitted to sell its product directly to a bar, restaurant, or liquor store. By doing this, Montgomery County allows a brewery to act as its own distributor, thereby bypassing the county’s control.

Conversely, since Prince George’s County is not an alcohol control county, no similar liquor store restrictions are in place. That does not mean, however, that a consumer can purchase beer anywhere they choose. Unlike in DC, in many Maryland counties consumers cannot purchase beer in grocery stores like Safeway or Trader Joe’s.

I discussed Montgomery County’s four exceptions above, but in Prince George’s, each grocery store chain may choose one of its locations in the county to sell beer and wine. Beyond that, beer, wine, and spirits can only be bought at liquor stores and convenience stores. When I attempted to purchase beer for our barbecue back in August, it was fortunate that I wasn’t doing so on a Sunday.

Prince George’s County forbids the retail sale of alcohol on Sunday, but you can still purchase beer and alcohol on Sundays at bars and restaurants. Aside from Sunday, retail establishments can sell beer, wine, and spirits between the hours of 6:00 am and 12:00 am.

Bars and restaurants can sell from 6:00 am until 2:00 am. Interestingly, even restaurants cannot sell alcohol in excess of 15.5% ABV on Sundays. In Montgomery County, on the other hand, alcohol sales are permitted on Sundays. Patrons can purchase alcohol at retail establishments between the hours of 6:00 am and 1:00 am.

Bars and restaurants in Montgomery County are permitted to serve from 9:00 am to 1:00 am Monday-Thursday, on Friday and Saturday between 9:00 am and 2:00 am, and Sunday from 10:00 am to 1:00 am. Retail sales are permitted from 6:00 am to 1:00 am all days.

Montgomery County Prince George’s County
Retail Hours 6:00 am – 1:00 am 6:00 am – 12:00 am
Bar/Restaurant Hours 9:00 am – 1:00 am (M-Th) 9:00 am – 2:00 pm (F, Sat.) 6:00 am – 2:00 am
Sunday Retail 6:00 am – 1:00 am None
Sunday Restaurant 10:00 am – 1:00 am 6:00 am – 12:00 am

How is alcohol sold in Maryland?

Somerset County: – A person eighteen (18) years of age or older may serve any alcoholic beverage while serving as a food service waiter or waitress in a restaurant. (b) No person under the age of twenty-one (21) may act as a bartender, barmaid, waiter or waitress in any solely bar or lounge related capacity.

C) No person under the age of twenty-one (21) may act as a package goods clerk. A person sixteen (16) years of age or older may work as a stock clerk stocking alcoholic beverages. Alcohol may be Sold: Monday through Saturday, from 6 a.m. to 2 a.m. Sunday, from 12:30 p.m. to midnight if food is available for purchase on the premises.

The license holder may not sell beer, wine, or liquor at a bar or counter on Sunday. Contact your Liquor Board Office for any differences according to your type of License

Do supermarkets sell liquor in Maryland?

By Emma Craig 3/16/2021 – Many consumers wonder why they may purchase beer and wine from grocery stores in other states but cannot do so in Maryland. Currently, 47 states and the District of Columbia allow grocery stores to sell beer while 40 states and the District of Columbia allow them to sell wine.

  1. According to one report, 98% of Americans can buy beer and 85% can purchase wine in grocery stores.
  2. Grocery stores in Maryland may soon be able to sell beer and wine to consumers.
  3. During this 2021 Session, the Maryland General Assembly is considering a Bill, “Alcoholic Beverages – Class A Licenses – Retail Grocery Establishments (the Health Food Accountability Act of 2021)” ( House Bill 996 and Senate Bill 763 ), which would allow retail grocery stores to hold beer or beer and wine licenses.

Currently, alcohol distribution in Maryland is constrained by a 1978 law that prohibits grocery and other stores from obtaining alcohol licenses, with some exceptions, Under the current Maryland Alcoholic Beverages Code, a local liquor board may not issue a beer, wine, or liquor license to a chain store, a supermarket, or a discount house.

However, establishments that held a beer, wine, or liquor license prior to the enactment of this law were exempted from this prohibition, allowing a few retail grocers in Maryland to sell beer and wine to consumers. For example, three grocery stores in Montgomery County may sell beer and wine because they were licensed to do so before the law changed.

Under the proposed legislation, a local liquor board would be empowered to issue beer and wine licenses to retail grocers that carries at least six of the seven following items: fresh produce, fresh meat, dairy products, canned foods, frozen foods, dry goods, and nonalcoholic beverages.

Additionally, the legislation would require a local liquor board to issue a beer and/or wine license to such establishments that are located in priority funding areas, which includes municipalities, areas inside the Washington and Baltimore Beltways, and areas designated as enterprise zones, neighborhood revitalization areas, heritage areas, and existing industrial land.

In a committee hearing on House Bill 996, Delegate Lily Qi, who is sponsoring the legislation, explained that the bill was intended to address food insecurities in the State, based on priority funding areas. Grocery stores operate on thin profit margins due to high competition in the industry, which keeps supermarkets from entering remote rural regions and dense urban areas because of heavy reliance on government subsidy programs.

Delegate Qi believes that the bill would encourage grocers to move into these food insecure areas to offer fresh food options by allowing them to improve their profit margins by offering beer and wine to consumers. In addition to addressing food insecurity, the proposed legislation would satisfy consumer wishes.

Data from a poll released by Marylanders for Better Beer and Wine Laws (“MBBWL”) indicates that Marylanders favor allowing chain stores to sell alcohol by a 2-1 ratio. The poll found that 71% of Marylanders approve of beer sales in grocery stores and 73% support wine sales in grocery stores.

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While only 56% of Marylanders think grocery stores should be able to sell liquor, this is comparable to the 52% of Marylanders that favored legalization of table gaming, which was legalized in Maryland in 2012, and the 57% that support legalization of recreational marijuana, which is also being considered this legislative session.

While consumers are largely receptive to the expansion of liquor licenses to grocery stores, specific interest groups are avidly in favor of or opposed to the legislation. MBBWL and the Maryland Retailers Association (MRA) are vocally supportive of the legislation.

Supporters offer a number of justifications for the expansion. First, they claim that the legislation will help balance Maryland’s budget, which is especially salient during concerns over the pandemic’s impact on the State budget. MBBWL estimates that the expansion can generate $200 million in economic benefit to the State.

A prior 2012 study had also projected that the expansion would generate significant economic gain for the State, almost $100 million in economic benefit and an additional 500 jobs. Supporters also argue that the expansion would be more convenient for consumers and would improve choice and cost,

  1. Consumers would be able to make one stop for beer, wine, and groceries, which is attractive given contact dangers with the coronavirus.
  2. Additionally, expanding suppliers will offer more choices to consumers and could drive down costs.
  3. MBBWL projects that a popular bottle of wine at a chain store would be 33% less than the price at an independent liquor store in the State.

Those opposing the legislation largely argue that the expansion would harm independent liquor store owners, many of which are small business owners. The same 2012 study that MBBWL relied on years ago projected that liquor stores would lose $13,624 in beer sales revenue and $3,489 in revenue from wine sales.

This year, the Fiscal and Policy Note for House Bill 996 noted that while “mall business grocery stores and convenience stores are likely to benefit meaningfully from the authority to sell alcoholic beverages, small businesses that are licensed to sell alcoholic beverages under current law are likely to lose business as grocery stores and convenience stores begin to sell alcoholic beverages as well.” The Distilled Spirits Council of the United States has testified on other states’ legislation that allowing grocery stores to sell wine would put independent stores out of business and threaten local jobs because foot traffic to those small independent liquor stores would be reduced.

In testimony to the Maryland General Assembly, it also noted that after Tennessee made a similar change in 2016, sales for independent stores went down roughly 9% and the state lost $3.6 million in tax revenue. In addition, some opponents dispute that the expansion of licenses would benefit Maryland given that most chain grocery stores are out-of-state entities, whereas independent liquor stores in the State are locally owned,

(For example, states can sometimes miss out on taxes from businesses that benefit from tax shelters in other states.) Opponents also question that the expansion would increase jobs in the State, doubting that the grocers would need to hire additional staff to handle the product. The expansion could also impact other industries in addition to liquor stores.

For instance, liquor stores may end up selling less spirits and local craft beer and wine due to less foot traffic if consumers choose to purchase their beer and wine from bigger chain stores. Since those stores could not offer liquor and may not offer as varied a selection of local beer and wine, distilleries and local craft breweries and wineries could experience fewer sales of their product.

  1. MBBWL disputes these opponents’ arguments that the expansion of licenses would hurt small liquor stores or negatively impact State revenue.
  2. For instance, MBBWL points out that only one small liquor store went out of business in Oklahoma in 2018 while the alcohol regulatory authority issued thousands more licenses.

They also point to Massachusetts, which saw an increase of $16.9 million in economic activity and an additional 150 jobs after expanding beer and wine licenses to grocery stores. While both sides present persuasive arguments and data, those arguments should be analyzed critically as each side is promoting its own interests and is not entirely neutral.

For instance, some have criticized Maryland’s prohibition against grocery stores selling alcohol as an intrusion into consumers’ “freedom to purchase beverage alcohol.” However, a state has the power to regulate alcohol in a way that serves the interests of its citizens, without overtly contradicting the federal government’s commercial interests.

That power is often delegated to local jurisdictions to best serve the localized needs of their constituents. So, while the regulation might be inconvenient to consumers, it is something the State may maintain for the health and benefit of the State. With conflicting arguments and data, the General Assembly will have to weigh the proposals and consider any resulting benefit and harm to the State.

The interests the General Assembly has to balance are important. On one hand, the data clearly indicates that consumers support the availability of beer and wine in retail grocery stores. On the other hand, small businesses, including independent liquor stores, support Maryland’s economy and could be hurt by the alcohol license expansion.

To address this latter concern, the General Assembly could consider geographic protective measures to protect current liquor stores from stifling chain store competition. Aside from consumer convenience, both sides dispute the economic impact for the State, with both presenting conflicting case studies.

  • If Maryland chooses to expand these licenses, it needs to ensure it can effectively capture economic revenue, especially from out-of-state chain corporations, through licensing and taxes,
  • In short, the General Assembly must weigh the interests of constituent consumers, local business owners, the State budget, and the likelihood that the bill will improve food deserts when deciding whether to allow retail grocers to sell beer and wine in the State.

The General Assembly session will end on April 12, 2021, You can follow the legislation on mgaleg.maryland.gov by searching for HB 996 and SB 763.

Does Trader Joe’s sell beer in Maryland?

Where and when you can get liquor to buy from a grocery store can be a tad confusing as it varies so much from state to state. But since Trader Joe’s is known to sell a lot of good stuff at low prices, you might be wondering, “Does Trader Joe’s sell liquor?” Here’s what I know from shopping there: Trader Joe’s does sell liquor in every state they operate in which allows grocery stores to sell liquor.

  • Those states include California, Colorado, Illinois, and Massachusetts, and many others, with some states having additional restrictions.
  • But don’t worry.
  • Below, I’ll cover every state and all the limits and restrictions per state.
  • And I’ll even review some of the details specifically about what brands Trader Joe’s carries in the states that allow it.

Let’s get started. Kris was very patient with me while in Trader Joe’s scoping out the wine section for what probably felt like an eternity 😅 pic.twitter.com/Bdf08fTV5i — cat lady (@MissEricaCC) December 11, 2020

Why can’t grocery stores sell liquor in Maryland?

Unlike most of the country, Maryland consumers can’t purchase alcohol at grocery stores. That may change soon. Proponents of reforming Maryland’s beverage alcohol laws are optimistic that next year the Free State will join the majority of the country in granting grocery stores and chain stores the freedom to sell beer, wine and maybe even liquor.

  1. Forty-seven states and D.C.
  2. Allow grocery stores to sell beer, and 40 and D.C.
  3. Allow them to sell wine, according to the Maryland Retailers Association.
  4. Maryland’s alcohol distribution is governed by a 1978 law that explicitly denies alcohol licenses to chain and discount stores, poorly defined, and limits licenses to Maryland residents, who can only hold one license.

Some stores were grandfathered in the 1978 law, which is why the Giant grocery in White Oak, in Montgomery County, sells beer and wine but other Giant outlets don’t. And Maryland gives considerable leeway to counties and cities in regulating alcohol sales, so you will see a few stores with the same or similar names, but you won’t see that they have different family members listed on the licenses.

It’s a messy hodgepodge that does not serve Maryland consumers well. The law was designed to protect the mom-and-pop beer and wine shops that dominate the retail landscape but are beholden to large wholesalers in the national three-tier system established after the repeal of Prohibition. A smattering of independent, quality-minded retailers have chipped away at the margins, especially in cities such as Annapolis, Baltimore and Frederick — and, more recently in Montgomery County.

But Marylanders lag behind the rest of the country in their freedom to purchase beverage alcohol. “Ninety-eight percent of Americans can go to a grocery store and buy beer. Eighty-five percent can buy wine,” says Adam Borden, of Marylanders for Better Beer and Wine Laws, which has been advocating for chain store sales since 2012.

MBBWL helped change the state’s laws a few years ago to allow Maryland residents to purchase wine directly from wineries. The group released a new survey in July that said 67 percent of Maryland consumers favored allowing chain stores to sell alcoholic beverages. “We’re one of the last states left restricting the free market for alcohol sales,” says Cailey Locklair, president of the Maryland Retailers Association, the Maryland Association of Chain Drug Stores, the Tri-State Jewelers Association and the Maryland Food Industry Council.

“I can’t think of any other retail sector where we allow fiefdoms to control the market and we protect them. Do we or do we not want a free market? Consumers do.” Borden and Locklair cite similar reasons for hope that the legislature in Annapolis, which has staunchly resisted change, might be receptive to their pleas in the 2021 session.

About a third of legislators are new after the 2018 elections, and the leadership of both houses has changed. And last year, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a Tennessee law with a key provision similar to Maryland’s, ruling that a state residency requirement to hold an alcohol license violated the Constitution’s Commerce Clause.

That lawsuit was brought by Total Wine & More, the Bethesda, Md. -based chain with more than 100 stores nationwide. (Total has two stores in Maryland, with different individuals on the licenses.) The Maryland Retailers Association has launched a new website,, to educate consumers and help them contact their legislators in Annapolis.

Locklair said the group will soon release a survey showing widespread support and a projection of how much the state could earn from the sale of alcohol licenses. Borden estimated that the state would gain a windfall of about $200 million dollars from the initial sale of licenses and $50 million to $70 million a year after that.

Fees could be tiered, with convenience stores paying $35,000 for a license, a drugstore such as CVS or Walgreens $50,000, grocery stores $250,000 and club stores such as Costco or Sam’s Club $500,000, he said. “We track about 2,000 stores in the state, and we estimate about two-thirds would apply for a license in the first year,” Borden said, citing the experience of Tennessee and Colorado, which liberalized their licensing laws in recent years.

The record from those states also demonstrates that the beer and wine stores protected by the current law would likely not suffer or go out of business, he said. Change will not come easy. The Wine and Spirits Wholesalers of America, a national lobbying group, has not taken a stance on the issue in Maryland, but the state’s wholesalers would seem to have an interest in the status quo.

They would have to sell to many more retailers and face the price pressure from the buying power of large stores such as Costco. Perhaps more tellingly, the Maryland Retailers Association and MBBWL are not working together, despite seeking the same goal and using nearly identical arguments.

Borden and Locklair would not tell me why, but it is apparent there is distrust between the two groups. And the difficult multiyear effort to change the direct shipping laws demonstrated how difficult it is to move Annapolis on issues involving the sale and distribution of alcohol. Tom Wark, head of the National Association of Wine Retailers, a group that lobbies for freedom of interstate shipping, said his group would sit out this fight.

But he added a caution. “Where alcohol is concerned, your state politicians are corrupt,” he said. : Unlike most of the country, Maryland consumers can’t purchase alcohol at grocery stores. That may change soon.