When Is Tick Season In Maryland?

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When Is Tick Season In Maryland
Get “Ticked Off” – Repellent, showers, and tick checks can prevent tick bites. When you go out: Look for ticks in the late spring through early fall, when they are most active. Ticks are most often found in wooded and marshy areas, in bushes, leaf litter, and tall grass,

When hiking, stay in the center of the trail, Wear long pants and long sleeves when you are outside. Tuck your shirt into your pants, and your pants into your socks, to keep ticks on the outside of your clothes. Remember there can be ticks in your yard, so take the same precautions when gardening or playing outdoors,

Use a repellent with DEET (a chemical found in many repellents) on skin, Repellents containing 20% or more DEET can protect up to several hours. Always follow product instructions. Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding the hands, eyes, and mouth.

  1. If you are outside often, consider treating your clothes and gear with permethrin, a repellent for clothing (not to be used directly on skin).
  2. Pre-treated clothing is available and may be protective longer.
  3. When you come inside: Check your clothing for ticks.
  4. Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for at least 10 minutes to kill ticks.

Or wash clothes in hot water, then dry. Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease. Showering may help wash off unattached ticks and it is a good time to do a tick check.

Under the arms In and around the ears Inside belly button Back of the knees In and around the hair Between the legs Around the waist

See instructions below on how to remove a tick safely. To prevent ticks in your yard, visit the CDC’s Preventing Ticks in the Yard page. For information on preventing both tick and mosquito bites, visit our Fight the Bite page.

When are ticks most active in MD?

When is Tick Season in Maryland? – Ticks in Maryland follow the Mid-Atlantic pattern. They are very active from spring to the fall. That said, you should always check for ticks after spending time outdoors, even during the winter, as ticks can remain active as long as temperatures stay above freezing.

What months are ticks most active?

Tick exposure can occur year-round, but ticks are most active during warmer months (April-September). Know which ticks are most common in your area,

What months are ticks worse?

In May, tick nymphs emerge, joining the adults to make it the tickiest month of the year, says Thomas Mather, PhD, who directs the University of Rhode Island’s Center for Vector-Borne Disease. May through August is generally peak season for catching Lyme disease, according to the CDC.

What time of year are ticks the worst?

Who gets Lyme disease? – Lyme disease can affect people of any age. People who spend time in grassy and wooded environments are at an increased risk of exposure. The chances of being bitten by a deer tick are greater during times of the year when ticks are most active.

Young deer ticks, called nymphs, are active from mid-May to mid-August and are about the size of poppy seeds. Adult ticks, which are approximately the size of sesame seeds, are most active from March to mid-May and from mid-August to November. Both nymphs and adults can transmit Lyme disease. Ticks can be active any time the temperature is above freezing.

Infected deer ticks can be found throughout New York State.

Can you get ticks in March?

What are ticks? What are tick bites? Or rather, what makes ticks, er, tick? And why do they bite us? While ticks and tick bites can seem very frightening, there’s actually little you need to worry about if you take preventative steps. Find out how to combat ticks with these helpful tips and tricks.

  • Globally, there are nearly 1000 unique species of ticks, and they’re found everywhere across the United States.
  • Depending on where you live, ticks can be a pest at any time of year.
  • Tick season, however, generally begins when the weather warms and dormant ticks begin to look for food — in most places in the U.S., that’s in late March and April.

Tick season typically ends when the temperatures begin dropping below freezing in the Fall. In some moderate climates, like California, ticks are active throughout the year. Yes. Ticks go through stages in their metamorphosis from larva to adult. Of the tick-borne diseases like Lyme disease, immature ticks (or nymphs) most frequently cause infection.

According to the CDC, adult ticks are much larger and more likely to be removed before transmitting the bacteria that causes infections like Lyme disease. Most bites never create more than some swelling. But ticks are parasites and can transmit blood-borne diseases like Lyme disease, Babesiosis, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Lyme disease can be transmitted by the blacklegged tick, which is found throughout the southeastern and eastern United States – like Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

  1. If you’re looking for more location-specific information, the CDC offers informative summaries and geographic maps of tick populations,
  2. If you find a tick that has freshly bitten and hung on to your skin, remove it with a tweezers as soon as possible.
  3. It’s a good idea to wash your hands and the area around the bite with warm water and soap, according to the Mayo Clinic,

You do not need to bring the tick in to your primary care provider. What happens if you can’t get the tick out? Ticks may burrow into your skin for up to 10 days before dropping off. It’s important to call your doctor if you can’t remove the tick or start to develop symptoms of a tick related illness in 3-30 days, such as:

  1. Fever
  2. Body aches and joint pain
  3. Rash

Antibiotic treatment for lyme disease is usually based on the history of a tick bite and symptoms. Lab testing may be ordered if the diagnosis is unclear, but is typically not necessary. Testing of the tick itself is not recommended as these results are unreliable, with frequent false positives and negatives.

In general, lab testing and treatment for lyme disease is not needed after a tick bite if you have no symptoms and the tick was removed within 36 hours. However, per the American Academy of Family Physicians, tick bites should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics (doxycycline in a single dose) only when an engorged black-legged tick is acquired in a high-risk area for Lyme disease.

Antibiotics are effective if given within 72 hours of tick removal. There are some simple things you can do to reduce the risk of becoming host to a tick.

  • Wear clothing that covers your legs and arms, especially when walking in rural, woodland, or grassy areas where ticks are most common
  • Take a shower or bath after you’ve been in an area likely to have ticks
  • Check your body for ticks, especially your armpits, your head, and your legs

For more information, Center for Disease Control has more information on high risk areas in the US and how to prevent tick borne illnesses. Ifyou have a tick bite and have any questions about removal or rashes, make an appointment today,

At what temperature are ticks no longer active?

Typically, ticks go into dormancy at temperatures below 35 degrees. Ticks can die in winter, but only when it gets very cold, like below 14 degrees. It’s rare for it to get this cold in Virginia. So, ticks never truly go away.

How long does a tick stay on you?

Tick Frequently Asked Questions 1. How do ticks bite without you feeling it? When Is Tick Season In Maryland Our partner at the University of Rhode Island Tick Encounter Resource Center (TERC) explains: Ticks actually numb the area before they bite. Their saliva contains a numbing agent, called kinases, so you won’t feel the bite. The area will remain numb the whole time the tick is feeding on a host’s blood.

  • If you have been bitten previously, you may notice a small red bite mark, which can be itchy.
  • If there is no tick at such a site, you may have already scratched it off without knowing it.2.
  • Is there a lab that I can send a tick to to see if it was carrying Lyme Disease prior to treating myself with the long series of antibiotics? We have a number of places listed on our,
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You can use our Tick Identification Chart to confirm that your tick is an adult deer tick. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC),Deer ticks are the only tick species that transmit Lyme in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central United States.3.

The tick biting me was nearly completely embedded under my skin. Does my doctor need to remove it? Ticks can only penetrate your skin with their mouth parts, which are called hypostome. Their bodies are never embedded under the skin. Don’t wait to see a doctor to remove an engorged, biting tick. It is easy to remove a tick safely by using TickEase tweezers.

Don’t worry if the head stays in, just disinfect the area with rubbing alcohol. You also might want to consider identifying and testing the tick for infection.4. If I find a tick biting me, should I cover it with Vaseline, dish detergent, oil, nail polish remover or touch it with a hot match to get it to detach? Absolutely not! These methods just agitate the tick.

And that can cause it to spit its pathogens into the bite, putting you at even greater risk of tick-borne diseases. The safest way to remove a tick is with a pointy tweezer like TickEase. Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible, and pull straight up in a firm but slow and steady motion until it pops out of the skin.

Clean the bite area thoroughly and consider saving the tick for testing.5. If I rarely go outside, and never go in the woods, how did the tick biting me find me? First, you should know that Black Legged ticks don’t travel very far on their own, perhaps only one or two meters.

  1. However, they do get moved around by animals.
  2. Pets, particularly cats, are notorious for picking up a tick outside and then bringing it inside to humans.
  3. If the tick attaches to your cat or dog’s fur, it will not typically leave it, but if the animal comes inside or you pick it up, loose ticks crawling on the animals fur can easily transfer over to you.

One helpful suggestion: comb or brush your dog or cat before they come into the house.6. I was bitten by a tick recently and now there is a big red spot. Should I be worried? It depends on how recently. Within three days of being bitten by a tick, many people will develop a red spot that never expands to bigger than a dime.

This is just an allergic reaction to the saliva that the tick is spitting into you. Watch the site, however. If the red spot grows in size over a period of a week or so, to bigger than two inches, then it is likely to be a sign that you are infected with the Lyme Disease agent. However, only about 35 percent of people who are infected with Lyme will develop the bullseye rash.

And many people who get Lyme never recall a tick bite.7. Is it possible for a tick to become embedded in a person’s scalp so deep that there is no lump there? No! Ticks can only embed their hypostome or mouthpart into the skin. Their palps, which cover the hypostome to protect it when the tick is not feeding, fold back and prevent the tick from going any further into your skin.8.

I just pulled a corn kernel looking tick off my 3 month old yorkshire terrier puppy, should I take her to the vet? During the Fall and early Spring in the northeast, mid-Atlantic and upper mid-west, ticks that look like a “corn kernel” are most likely to be partially engorged female deer ticks – most likely attached for about three days to look like a corn kernel.

Their body generally looks pale at this stage and they have not started to swell up big.If the dog has the Lyme disease vaccine, it may be fine. However, three days is long enough for a deer tick to transmit Lyme Disease bacteria and/or another serious disease called Aanaplasmosis.

  • You could give your vet a call and see if they will take any prophylactic measures.9.
  • Today I pulled out a dog tick out of my scalp.
  • It was relatively easy to pull out as I only used my fingers to slide it out of my hair.
  • I determined it is a dog tick possibly adult, but fairly flat.
  • Can this type of tick transfer any disease? American dog ticks can be infected with Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever rickettsia, other less pathogenic rickettsia, Colorado Tick Fever virus, and rarely, with the agent of tularemia.

Hopefully, the only concern is a bit of a tick bite. Any symptoms that develop require medical attention.10. I was bitten by a tick recently. It was itching terribly, that is how I found the tick. I pulled it off. It was so small I could not identify it. The site is very swollen, still itches, is red, and seems to be spreading larger.

  • Should I be alarmed or concerned about this bite? It certainly sounds like a tick bite.
  • In people that have previously been bitten by the same type of tick, there often is a histamine-mediated hypersensitivity reaction that occurs within 20-40 hrs of another tick bite.
  • It’s your body making a reaction to a foreign substance (tick saliva) that it has seen before.

In some people it can become quite severe-a localized anaphylaxis. It would be a good idea to see your primary medical provider, and be sure to mention your tick bite.11. When a tick bites how long does it stay attached? The length of time a tick stays attached depends on the tick species, tick life stage and the host immunity.

It also depends on whether you do a daily tick check. Generally if undisturbed, larvae remain attached and feeding for about three days, nymphs for three to four days, and adult females for seven to ten days. Deer ticks feed a day or so faster than Lone Star ticks and American dog ticks. You might be interested in our,

Ticks change their appearance pretty dramatically as they feed – which can make identifying them challenging. Host immunity also can impact duration of tick attachment as well. Prior sensitization to specific proteins in tick saliva can make it harder for ticks to ingest blood.

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: Tick Frequently Asked Questions

Do ticks come off in the shower?

After You Come Indoors –

Check your clothing for ticks. Ticks may attach to clothing. Remove any ticks and wash clothes or put them in dryer if damp. Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors. If the clothes are damp, you may need to dry them longer. When washing clothes first, use hot water. Cold and medium temperature water will not kill ticks effectively. Check your body for ticks after being outdoors. Conduct a full body check when coming from potentially tick-infested areas, even your back yard. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body. Check you and your children for ticks after coming indoors. Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tickborne diseases. Showering may help wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.

To remove a tick, grasp it with tweezers, as close to the skin as possible, and pull it straight out.

What conditions do ticks prefer?

Where Do Ticks Live? – Ticks live in shady and moist areas usually around ground level. They will generally cling to tall grass and low shrubs and are ready to jump off these locations onto their next prey. Around your home, you’ll find ticks around your lawn, in your garden and around the edge of woods and forests.

What time of the day are ticks most active?

June 17, 2020 Jean Tsao is an associate professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, She and her colleagues developed a mobile health app, The Tick App, that informs users how human behavior affects tick bites. Tsao answers questions on ticks and tick-borne disease prevention. Q: How can people avoid tick bites while enjoying the outdoors? Is there any proper attire or bug spray to use? A: There are generally three principles with various options to carry out: avoid tick habitat; use an EPA-approved repellant following the manufacturer’s instructions (most of the ones approved for mosquitoes are approved for ticks; just check the label; it will say); conduct thorough tick checks. I would do it when you’re recreating/working in tick habitat, before you get back in your car — check yourselves as well as your pets — and then do another through check when you take a shower/bath within two hours of coming back from recreating/working in tick habitat. There is one more thing you can do to reduce any loose blacklegged ticks from later finding you/others/your pets: Put your clothes that you wore directly into the dryer for ten minutes on high heat to kill ticks. Q: What should we do if we find a tick on us? What’s the proper removal process? Don’t panic! Carefully grab it with tweezers at the point closest to your skin to remove it. Then, take a clear photo and submit it to The Tick App so the team can identify the species. Afterwards, put the tick in a plastic bag labeled with the date and geographic location where you think you may have contacted it; then, store it in your freezer. If you start feeling ill, go to a doctor and show them your tick. The species and degree of swelling can help with diagnosis and treatment. Q: What are telltale signs of Lyme disease or other tick-borne illnesses? A: Not being a medical worker, I’m not comfortable answering this question, so I suggest looking to the links on the CDC website, But, I would comment that my impression is that many people who have tick-borne illnesses experience general “flu-like” symptoms — fever, malaise, achiness, which is why they might be difficult to diagnose as a particular tick-borne disease, Q: Why/how do ticks and tick bites lead to Lyme disease? A: People can become infected with the agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, if they are bitten by an infected tick. There are three stages of ticks that look for a host so that they can get a blood meal: the larva (baby), nymph (teenager) and the adult female (adult). The larva needs a blood meal in order to become a nymph; the nymph needs a blood meal in order to become an adult; and an adult female needs a blood meal in order to lay eggs. The adult male doesn’t feed so does not need a blood meal. The larva hatches uninfected — so it’s through the bloodmeal from an infected host, that it acquires Lyme disease bacteria. Then when it molts to become a nymph, the bacteria survive the developmental process and the new nymph that emerges carries the bacteria in its gut. When the flat, infected nymph finds a host and feeds, the bacteria in the gut multiply — then they break out of the gut, swim through the hemocoel of the tick (where the tick’s blood bathes its organs), invades the salivary glands, and then gets injected into the host. This is why it is so important to try to find and remove ticks as soon as possible. Even if the tick has attached, if it’s 72 hours, you’re much more likely to become infected and experience signs of disease. Q: What are the chances of getting Lyme disease from a tick, and what are the chances of being bitten at all? A: Not all tick species transmit the Lyme disease pathogen. Your chances of getting Lyme disease from a tick depends geographically. More than 95% of cases of Lyme disease in the U.S. are caused by the blacklegged ticks distributed among the states in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and North Central regions. In these regions, ~20-30% of blacklegged nymphs are infected and ~40-60% of adult females are infected. But, as stated above, even if an infected tick bites you, if you can remove it before it has fed > 36 hours, your chances of becoming sick are very low. Q: What time of day are they most active? Where do they often hide? A: These ticks are active day and night if it’s warm enough, but if it becomes too dry, they become less active. Ticks are prone to dessication, and so if it’s dry, they hunker down below the leaf litter, where it’s more moist, and re-hydrate and conserve energy. Research from the 80s suggests that adult and nymphal ticks were the most active during their study, which was from 6 a.m. – 9 p.m., but most active from 6 a.m. – noon. But the fact that you can find blacklegged larvae and nymphs on wildlife that are nocturnal, diurnal and crepuscular tells you that the ticks are active all the time. The American dog tick is a tick that is can be found in woods, but can survive and do well in grassy areas, too. Lone star ticks also are more associated with wooded areas, but they can be found in areas outside woods. Q: How can people create a tick-free zone around a camping area or campsite? And subsequently how can people avoid bringing them back home? A: Knowing that ticks are associated with leaf litter and vegetation, I would recommend people to place their campsite in a more open area within the designated campsite — not right up against the vegetation. It won’t be tick free, but at least for blacklegged ticks, they do not tend to crawl out from the vegetation towards people. And, just as one can treat clothes and shoes, one can also treat camping gear with permethrin, which will prevent you from bringing ticks home. Permethrin can stun and/or kill ticks on contact and so if they get on clothes/gear, they will fall off, and potentially die. But, one should always inspect their gear before packing up everything regardless if you use permethrin. For more information about ticks, visit CDC.gov,

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Where do ticks bite most often?

What does a tick bite look like? – If you’re worried you may have been exposed to a tick-borne illness, it’s obvious to wonder what a tick bite looks like. Unless a rash appears, a tick bite is likely to look much like any other bug bite. So how do you know if you have a tick bite? The following pictures of tick bites may help. When Is Tick Season In Maryland In this photo, the tick is still attached, having burrowed its head into the skin to feed. The redness around the tick indicates inflammation in the skin. When Is Tick Season In Maryland In this photo, the tick is still attached to the skin and appears larger because it has been feeding longer. This is an example of an engorged tick, so called because it has been gorging on blood. Other bug bites can sometimes resemble tick bites, and therefore, it isn’t always easy to know whether you or a loved one have been bitten by a tick.

Tick bites are not fluid-filled, whereas bites from ants and other insects are typically pus-filled. Location can sometimes help distinguish tick bites from other insect bites because ticks most commonly bite the back of the neck, scalp, groin, and legs. Other bug bites, particularly those from fleas or bed bugs, may be multiple in number. Ticks typically bite once and then burrow their head under the skin.

Are ticks more active in rain?

The rain brings out the ticks MONTEREY >> After five years of drought, the heavy rains are bringing back greenery and the ticks are loving it. Following bouts of rain, ticks may be out and about in greater numbers, according to Larisa Vredevoe, a professor of biological sciences at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Ticks can desiccate, or dry out, during times of low humidity. They can even become inactive or enter diapause, a period where they stop developing because of unpropitious environmental conditions, Vredevoe said. Rain protects ticks from such situations, allowing them to seek hosts for longer periods of time. “A tick can only quest up on vegetation for hosts when the humidity is high enough for them to absorb sufficient water from the air,” said Vredevoe. At lower humidities, the ticks are forced to descend the shrubbery and wait on the ground for the conditions to better. The heavy rainfall can also increase the amount of host animals wandering around in the nutritious grasslands, leading to more potential hosts on which ticks can feed. “That means that after heavy rains, animals and people can encounter more ticks on vegetation they brush against while they are out hiking than during drier times of the year,” Vredevoe said. According to Alec Gerry, a professor of entomology at UC Riverside, the heavy rains can also have an indirect effect on the ticks by cultivating a rich environment for them. Long-term effects of heavy rain are thick and long vegetation — all the more protection for the lurking ticks. The long grasses and weeds not only protect the invisible pests but they also create a longer ladder for the ticks to reach their food — small rodents, rabbits and birds. Sometimes, humans. “They do well in more vegetation and rainfall has generally benefitted the ticks,” said Gerry. But, that doesn’t necessarily mean they increased in numbers. According to the California Department of Public Health, there is no indication that there has been an increase in ticks this year. A good rainy season this year would have little to no effect on tick populations this year but may affect tick survival in future years, according to the Department of Public Health.

Where is the most likely place to find ticks?

Tick habitat could be right outside your door – Generally, tick populations tend to be higher in elevation, in wooded and grassy areas where the creatures they feed on live and roam, including deer, rabbits, birds, lizards, squirrels, mice, and other rodents.

However, they can also be found in urban areas as well as on beaches in coastal areas. They also like moist and humid environments, which tend to be closer to the ground—such as among logs, fallen branches, tall brush, and grassy areas. Ticks in the early lifecycle stages—larvae and nymphs—are often found in piles of decomposing leaves under trees.

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Not only do these inviting conditions exist in remote wilderness they can be found in parks, fields, picnic areas, and residential areas including your backyard, The following are a few common tick habitats where it’s advisable to keep a close eye out for ticks:

Wood piles, which can often harbor mice and other rodents High grassy areas Wooded areas Stone walls and other features that may retain moisture Leaf piles and litter Fallen and low-hanging branches Overgrown shrubs Bird feeders (because they can invite other tick-attracting wildlife)

To mitigate the risk of ticks near your home, prune trees and shrubbery, keep grass short, clear out wood piles, leaf piles, litter, and fallen branches, and consider removing stone walls and bird feeders.

What time of day are ticks the most active?

June 17, 2020 Jean Tsao is an associate professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, She and her colleagues developed a mobile health app, The Tick App, that informs users how human behavior affects tick bites. Tsao answers questions on ticks and tick-borne disease prevention. Q: How can people avoid tick bites while enjoying the outdoors? Is there any proper attire or bug spray to use? A: There are generally three principles with various options to carry out: avoid tick habitat; use an EPA-approved repellant following the manufacturer’s instructions (most of the ones approved for mosquitoes are approved for ticks; just check the label; it will say); conduct thorough tick checks. I would do it when you’re recreating/working in tick habitat, before you get back in your car — check yourselves as well as your pets — and then do another through check when you take a shower/bath within two hours of coming back from recreating/working in tick habitat. There is one more thing you can do to reduce any loose blacklegged ticks from later finding you/others/your pets: Put your clothes that you wore directly into the dryer for ten minutes on high heat to kill ticks. Q: What should we do if we find a tick on us? What’s the proper removal process? Don’t panic! Carefully grab it with tweezers at the point closest to your skin to remove it. Then, take a clear photo and submit it to The Tick App so the team can identify the species. Afterwards, put the tick in a plastic bag labeled with the date and geographic location where you think you may have contacted it; then, store it in your freezer. If you start feeling ill, go to a doctor and show them your tick. The species and degree of swelling can help with diagnosis and treatment. Q: What are telltale signs of Lyme disease or other tick-borne illnesses? A: Not being a medical worker, I’m not comfortable answering this question, so I suggest looking to the links on the CDC website, But, I would comment that my impression is that many people who have tick-borne illnesses experience general “flu-like” symptoms — fever, malaise, achiness, which is why they might be difficult to diagnose as a particular tick-borne disease, Q: Why/how do ticks and tick bites lead to Lyme disease? A: People can become infected with the agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, if they are bitten by an infected tick. There are three stages of ticks that look for a host so that they can get a blood meal: the larva (baby), nymph (teenager) and the adult female (adult). The larva needs a blood meal in order to become a nymph; the nymph needs a blood meal in order to become an adult; and an adult female needs a blood meal in order to lay eggs. The adult male doesn’t feed so does not need a blood meal. The larva hatches uninfected — so it’s through the bloodmeal from an infected host, that it acquires Lyme disease bacteria. Then when it molts to become a nymph, the bacteria survive the developmental process and the new nymph that emerges carries the bacteria in its gut. When the flat, infected nymph finds a host and feeds, the bacteria in the gut multiply — then they break out of the gut, swim through the hemocoel of the tick (where the tick’s blood bathes its organs), invades the salivary glands, and then gets injected into the host. This is why it is so important to try to find and remove ticks as soon as possible. Even if the tick has attached, if it’s 72 hours, you’re much more likely to become infected and experience signs of disease. Q: What are the chances of getting Lyme disease from a tick, and what are the chances of being bitten at all? A: Not all tick species transmit the Lyme disease pathogen. Your chances of getting Lyme disease from a tick depends geographically. More than 95% of cases of Lyme disease in the U.S. are caused by the blacklegged ticks distributed among the states in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and North Central regions. In these regions, ~20-30% of blacklegged nymphs are infected and ~40-60% of adult females are infected. But, as stated above, even if an infected tick bites you, if you can remove it before it has fed > 36 hours, your chances of becoming sick are very low. Q: What time of day are they most active? Where do they often hide? A: These ticks are active day and night if it’s warm enough, but if it becomes too dry, they become less active. Ticks are prone to dessication, and so if it’s dry, they hunker down below the leaf litter, where it’s more moist, and re-hydrate and conserve energy. Research from the 80s suggests that adult and nymphal ticks were the most active during their study, which was from 6 a.m. – 9 p.m., but most active from 6 a.m. – noon. But the fact that you can find blacklegged larvae and nymphs on wildlife that are nocturnal, diurnal and crepuscular tells you that the ticks are active all the time. The American dog tick is a tick that is can be found in woods, but can survive and do well in grassy areas, too. Lone star ticks also are more associated with wooded areas, but they can be found in areas outside woods. Q: How can people create a tick-free zone around a camping area or campsite? And subsequently how can people avoid bringing them back home? A: Knowing that ticks are associated with leaf litter and vegetation, I would recommend people to place their campsite in a more open area within the designated campsite — not right up against the vegetation. It won’t be tick free, but at least for blacklegged ticks, they do not tend to crawl out from the vegetation towards people. And, just as one can treat clothes and shoes, one can also treat camping gear with permethrin, which will prevent you from bringing ticks home. Permethrin can stun and/or kill ticks on contact and so if they get on clothes/gear, they will fall off, and potentially die. But, one should always inspect their gear before packing up everything regardless if you use permethrin. For more information about ticks, visit CDC.gov,

How common are ticks in Maryland?

Not very common in Maryland. If you find a tick on yourself, someone else or a pet, remove it as soon as possible.

Where is the most likely place to find ticks?

Tick habitat could be right outside your door – Generally, tick populations tend to be higher in elevation, in wooded and grassy areas where the creatures they feed on live and roam, including deer, rabbits, birds, lizards, squirrels, mice, and other rodents.

However, they can also be found in urban areas as well as on beaches in coastal areas. They also like moist and humid environments, which tend to be closer to the ground—such as among logs, fallen branches, tall brush, and grassy areas. Ticks in the early lifecycle stages—larvae and nymphs—are often found in piles of decomposing leaves under trees.

Not only do these inviting conditions exist in remote wilderness they can be found in parks, fields, picnic areas, and residential areas including your backyard, The following are a few common tick habitats where it’s advisable to keep a close eye out for ticks:

Wood piles, which can often harbor mice and other rodents High grassy areas Wooded areas Stone walls and other features that may retain moisture Leaf piles and litter Fallen and low-hanging branches Overgrown shrubs Bird feeders (because they can invite other tick-attracting wildlife)

To mitigate the risk of ticks near your home, prune trees and shrubbery, keep grass short, clear out wood piles, leaf piles, litter, and fallen branches, and consider removing stone walls and bird feeders.

What percent of ticks carry Lyme disease in Maryland?

Maryland is one of 12 states where the majority of all Lyme disease cases occur.20-30% of deer ticks in Maryland carry Lyme Disease. A tick must be attached to its host for 36 hours or longer to transmit disease. The rate of transmission of disease is only about 3% even if the deer tick is attached for 36 hours.