What Exotic Pets Are Legal In Maryland?

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What Exotic Pets Are Legal In Maryland
10 Types of Legal Exotic Pets in Maryland

  • Hyacinth Macaw.
  • Capybara.
  • Chinchilla.
  • Axolotl.
  • Hedgehog.
  • Sugar Glider.
  • Pot-Bellied Pig.
  • Tarantula.

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Are pet monkeys legal in Maryland?

Maryland – You are restricted from owning a wide variety of exotic pets in Maryland. Primates, feline and canine hybrids, foxes, racoons, bears, venomous snakes, large cats, alligators, and more are restricted from being kept as pets unless you owned them prior to 2006 and fulfilled the requirements at that time.

Can you own a pet sloth in Maryland?

Jill Kolodner | July 7, 2020 | Maryland Law Maryland is one of the many states in the country that prohibits the ownership of certain wild or exotic animals. While the law does not apply to zoos and other approved institutions, individuals cannot own the animals as pets.

Can I own a capybara in Maryland?

Pets Your Tenant Can Legally Own – Exotic pets that can legally own in Maryland include a cornucopia of rodents, marsupials, other mammals, and smaller creatures.

Cabybara: The capybara is the largest rodent in the animal kingdom. Hailing from South America, these animals can weigh up to 140 pounds. They are semi-aquatic, having webbed feet and enjoying time both in and out of the water. They are social creatures that need plenty of space to roam.and have a mainly vegetarian diet. The cabybara generally lives up to 12 years in captivity. Chinchilla: Chinchillas are more common as exotic household pets. They are rock-dwelling rodents from South America and are famous for their exquisitely soft fur. While they make for clean, entertaining, and fastidious little animals, they do not do well with young children, as they can be high-strung in nature. Chinchillas live around 12-20 years. Hedgehog: The African pygmy hedgehog is an adorable pet that bonds with its owner. It is a nocturnal animal that eats an array of food, from plants to insects to eggs. To defend itself, it will roll up into a ball and away from the scene. A downside is that they cover themselves with spit containing whatever new scent they find. The greatest risk is that their stool can carry Salmonella. Pot-bellied Pig: A pot-bellied pig needs plenty of space to roam. Owners often have trouble handling them over the 20 years of their lives, especially as they are hefty and potentially aggressive creatures. On the bright side, pot-bellied pigs are intelligent creatures that enjoy the same things that many dogs do. Tarantula: While classically frightening, tarantulas are the mildest of arachnids. If your has one of these animals as pets, you can expect up to 30 years of good behavior from it.

Can you have a pet fox in Maryland?

Do not bring a fox into the state of Maryland as a pet. Importing a skunk, raccoon, alligator, crocodile, and bear is also prohibited.

Can you own a gator in Maryland?

What you cannot do: – No reptiles or amphibians from List C may be possessed, bred, or sold. These animals may only be held in accordance with a Scientific Collection Permit or an Endangered Species Permit issued by the Department of Natural Resources. Venomous snakes may not be possessed as pets.

Are pet otters legal in Maryland?

Where and how do otters live? – There are only 13 extant species of otter across the world, They are mustelids which means they belong to the same family as weasels, minks and badgers, but form a part of the subfamily Lutrinae, Thanks to hunting, habit destruction and many other human activities, almost all species of otter are either endangered or at least threatened,

Fortunately, many governments and jurisdictions have created contingencies to try to protect these animals. In the UK, otters are fully protected under Sections 9 and 11 of Schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, The level of protection and types of otters present vary across different parts of the world.

Not all countries have strict protection laws and many otter populations are already in decline. Some of the different types of otter species include:

European otter ( Lutra lutra ): used to inhabit all of Europe, from the Northern Arctic regions down to North Africa and even extending into parts of Asia. From the middle of the 20th century, many populations severely decreased due to human interference. Populations are still falling today. Sea otter ( Enhydra lutris ): other otters can live in rivers, lakes, marshes, lagoons or any places with fresh water, but the sea otter is the only one which lives in the sea. They are the heaviest of otters, with thick fur to protect against cold seas. Although they can walk on land, they don’t have to, mainly scavenging and hunting on the sea floors off the coasts of North America. They are an endangered species. North American river otter ( Lontra canadensis ): often known as the common otter, these animals create dens close to the edge of the water and spend their time between water and land. They are particularly known for their playfulness. Giant otter ( Pteronura brasiliensis ): the giant otter is the longest of the species, the sea otter’s weight and abundant fur, make it bigger overall. Giant otters can be attacked by other animals, but do not have any direct natural predators. Humans, unfortunately, have hunted them to near extinction in some parts. Asian small-clawed otter ( Aonyx cinera ): so-called due to their partially webbed paws which give them amazing dexterity, more than any other otter species. The smallest of all otters, they are also the one species which has been sometimes kept in domestic situations as a pet. We will explain explain below.

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The North American river otter is the only river otter found in north of Mexico. It is illegal in all US States to keep this indigenous otter as a pets. Exotic animals have many guidelines regarding their maintenance in captivity, but possession laws do change depending on the State.

  1. It is illegal to keep almost all otters as pets in North America, with one exception.
  2. In some states, it is not illegal to keep an Asian small-clawed otter as a pet.
  3. There are several strict guidelines concerning their care and upkeep, but, in theory, you can keep an Asian small-clawed otter as a pet in some states of the USA.

The following is a list of reasons why you shouldn’t.

Can you have a wolf as a pet in Maryland?

Maryland – Category: B Summary of Law: No person may possess or breed the following species of animals as a “pet”: foxes, skunks, raccoons, all species of bears, alligators, crocodiles, all species of wild cats, wolves, nonhuman primates, various venomous reptiles, etc.

Is owning a raccoon legal in Maryland?

Bans on Raccoon Ownership – Many states do not allow possession of raccoons, Some states in which owning raccoons is forbidden by law include Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland and Massachusetts. This is just a partial list, though.

Does Maryland allow raccoons as pets?

Summary: Under this Maryland law, a person may not import into the State, offer for sale, trade, barter, possess, breed, or exchange the following species of animals: foxes, skunks, raccoons, bears, caimans, alligators, crocodiles, wild cats, wolves, nonhuman primates, and venomous snakes.

  1. Animal sanctuaries, AWA licensed facilities, those holding valid permits from the Department of Natural Resources, and veterinarians are exempted.
  2. This section does not prohibit a person who had lawful possession of an animal listed above on or before May 31, 2006, from continuing to possess that animal if the person provided written notification to the local animal control authority on or before August 1, 2006.

Violation results in a fine and seizure of the animal(s). Link to MD HEALTH GEN § 18-217 – 222 (Part IV. Animal Control) – This chapter of Maryland laws declares that it is in the public interest to ensure public health and safety by strictly regulating the possession, breeding, and importation of certain animals that pose risks to humans.

§ 10-621. Import, offer, or transfer of dangerous animal Application of section (a)(1) Except as provided in subsection (b)(2) of this section, this section does not apply to: (i) a research facility or federal research facility licensed under the federal Animal Welfare Act;1 (ii) the holder of a Class C Exhibitor’s License under the Animal Welfare Act, 7 U.S.C.

§ 2131 et seq., that displays the animals specified in subsection (b) of this section in a public setting as the exhibitor’s primary function; (iii) a person who possesses a valid license or permit issued by the Department of Natural Resources to import, sell, trade, barter, possess, breed, or exchange an animal specified in subsection (b) of this section; (iv) an animal sanctuary that: 1.

  • Is a nonprofit organization qualified under § 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code; 2.
  • Operates a place of refuge for abused, neglected, impounded, abandoned, orphaned, or displaced wildlife; 3.
  • Does not conduct commercial activity with respect to any animal of which the organization is an owner; and 4.

does not buy, sell, trade, lease, or breed any animal except as an integral part of the species survival plan of the American Zoo and Aquarium Association; (v) an animal control officer under the jurisdiction of the State or a local governing authority, a law enforcement officer acting under the authority of this subtitle, or a private contractor of a county or municipal corporation that is responsible for animal control operations; (vi) a person who holds a valid license to practice veterinary medicine in the State and treats the animal specified in subsection (b) of this section in accordance with customary and normal veterinary practices; (vii) a person who is not a resident of the State and is in the State for 10 days or less for the purpose of traveling between locations outside of the State; and (viii) a circus holding a Class C Exhibitor’s License under the Animal Welfare Act, 7 U.S.C.

§ 2131 et seq., that: 1. is in the State for less than 90 days per calendar year; 2. regularly conducts performances featuring live animals and multiple human entertainers, including acrobats and clowns; and 3. does not allow members of the public to be in proximity to an animal specified under subsection (b) of this section, including opportunities to be photographed with the animal, without sufficient distance and protective barriers.

(2)(i) This section does not prohibit a person who had lawful possession of an animal specified in subsection (b) of this section on or before May 31, 2006, from continuing to possess that animal if the person provides written notification to the local animal control authority on or before August 1, 2006.

  1. Ii) The notification shall include: 1.
  2. The person’s name, address, and telephone number; 2.
  3. The number and type of animals being kept; and 3.
  4. A photograph of the animal or a description of a tattoo or microchip identification of the animal.
  5. 3) This section does not prohibit a person who has a disability that severely limits mobility from possessing an animal specified in subsection (b) of this section if that animal is: (i) trained to perform tasks for the owner by an organization described in Section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code; and (ii) dedicated to improving the quality of life of a person who has a disability that severely limits mobility.
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Import, offer for sale, trade, barter, possess, breed, or exchange certain live animals prohibited (b)(1) A person may not import into the State, offer for sale, trade, barter, possess, breed, or exchange a live: (i) fox, skunk, raccoon, or bear; (ii) caiman, alligator, or crocodile; (iii) member of the cat family other than the domestic cat; (iv) hybrid of a member of the cat family and a domestic cat if the hybrid weighs over 30 pounds; (v) member of the dog family other than the domestic dog; (vi) hybrid of a member of the dog family and a domestic dog; (vii) nonhuman primate, including a lemur, monkey, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, marmoset, loris, or tamarin; or (viii) poisonous snake in the family groups of Hydrophidae, Elapidae, Viperidae, or Crotolidae.

2)(i) This paragraph does not apply to an entity described in subsection (a)(1)(i), (iii), (iv), (v), (vi), (vii), or (viii) of this section. (ii) Except as provided in subparagraph (iii) of this paragraph, the holder of a Class C Exhibitor’s License under the Animal Welfare Act, 7 U.S.C. § 2131 et seq., may not possess a nonhuman primate, bear, lion, tiger, leopard, clouded leopard, snow leopard, jaguar, cheetah, or cougar or a hybrid of one of these animals that was not owned by the holder of the license on June 30, 2014.

(iii) The holder of a Class C Exhibitor’s License under the Animal Welfare Act, 7 U.S.C. § 2131 et seq., may acquire or breed a nonhuman primate, bear, lion, tiger, leopard, clouded leopard, snow leopard, jaguar, cheetah, or cougar or a hybrid of one of these animals if the holder: 1.

  • Maintains a liability insurance policy of at least $1,000,000; 2.
  • Has a paid full-time director; 3.
  • Has at least one paid full-time staff member trained in the care of each species that the holder keeps; 4.
  • Has an animal disposition policy that provides for the placement of animals in appropriate facilities if the holder’s facility closes; and 5.

maintains and implements a training plan regarding zoonotic disease risk and prevention. Fines and penalties (c)(1) A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to: (i) if an individual, a fine not exceeding $1,000; or (ii) if not an individual, a fine not exceeding $10,000.

(2) The provisions of this section may be enforced by: (i) any State or local law enforcement officer; or (ii) the local animal control authority for the jurisdiction where the violation occurs. Seizure of animals (d)(1) An animal specified in subsection (b) of this section may be immediately seized if: (i) there is probable cause to believe that the possession of the animal is in violation of this section; or (ii) the animal poses a risk to public health or public safety.

(2) An animal specified in subsection (b) of this section that is seized may be returned to the person who had possession of the animal at the time the animal was seized only if it is established that: (i) possession of the animal by the person is not a violation of this section; and (ii) the return of the animal does not pose a risk to public health or public safety.

3)(i) Notice that the animal was seized shall be served on the person who had possession of the animal at the time the animal was seized by: 1. posting a copy of the notice at the place where the animal was seized; 2. regular and certified mail, return receipt requested; or 3. delivering the notice to a person residing on the property from which the animal was seized.

(ii) The notice shall include: 1. a description of the animal seized; 2. the authority for and the purpose of the seizure; 3. the time, place, and circumstances of the seizure; 4. a contact person and telephone number; 5. a statement that the person from whom the animal was seized may: A.

post security to prevent disposition of the animal; and B. request a hearing concerning the seizure; 6. a statement that failure to post security or request a hearing within 10 days of the date of the notice will result in the disposition of the animal; and 7. a statement that, unless a court finds that the seizure of the animal was not justified, the actual costs of the care, keeping, and disposal of the animal are the responsibility of the person from whom the animal was seized.

(4)(i) Before a seizure under paragraph (1) of this subsection occurs, the person in possession of the animal to be seized may request that the animal remain in the person’s physical custody for 30 days after the date the animal was to be seized. (ii) During the 30 days provided in subparagraph (i) of this paragraph, the person shall take all necessary actions to comply with this section.

Iii) At any reasonable time during the 30-day period, the local animal control authority may inspect the premises where the animal is being kept. (5)(i) If a person who retains possession of an animal under paragraph (4) of this subsection is not in compliance with this section after the 30-day period has expired, the local animal control authority shall seize the animal and place it in a holding facility that is appropriate for the species.

(ii) The authority seizing an animal under this paragraph shall provide notice of the seizure in the same manner as provided in paragraph (3) of this subsection. (6)(i) A person from whom an animal was seized may request a hearing in the District Court within 10 days of the seizure.

Ii) A hearing shall be held as soon as practicable to determine the validity of the seizure and the disposition of the animal. (7)(i) Unless the court finds that the seizure of the animal was not justified by law, a person from whom the animal specified in subsection (b) of this section is seized is liable for all actual costs of care, keeping, and disposal of the animal.

(ii) The costs required under this paragraph shall be paid in full unless a mutually satisfactory agreement is made between the local animal control authority and the person claiming an interest in the animal. (8)(i) If there is no request for a hearing within 10 days of the notice or if the court orders a permanent and final disposition of the animal, the local animal control authority shall take steps to find long-term placement of the animal with another appropriate facility that is equipped for the continued care of the particular species of the animal.

(ii) If there is no entity that is suitable for the care of the animal, the animal may be euthanized. Local laws and regulations (e) This section does not limit a county or municipality from enacting laws or adopting regulations that are more restrictive pertaining to any potentially dangerous animals, including those specified in subsection (b) of this section.

Death of owner (f) If the owner of an animal specified in subsection (b) of this section dies without making arrangements for the transfer of custody of the animal to another person, the animal may be turned over to one of the organizations specified in subsection (a)(1) of this section or euthanized if no suitable location can be found in a reasonable amount of time.

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Is it OK to have a capybara as a pet?

A capybara can be trained and when trained properly, can live in a home with other companion animals, like dogs and cats. People have reported that they make very nice pets. Having a wild animal as a pet however, is different than owning an animal that has been domesticated for many years.

Is it legal to own a penguin in Maryland?

Exotic Animals – Penguins are considered exotic animals. Now, that doesn’t necessarily make them illegal to own. There are many exotic animals that are perfectly legal to keep as pets in the United States. Granted, some of these animals will require you to get permits and prove you have proper accommodations for them.

  • Furthermore, laws regarding the sale, possession, and purchase of exotic animals differ from state to state.
  • Some other exotic animals that you can keep under certain circumstances include Chimpanzees and Wallabies,
  • Bearded dragons and hedgehogs are even considered to be exotic animals, but you can keep them without any permits or special paperwork.

However, penguins are not one of these species. The laws regarding penguins are far stricter than with other exotic animals, not just in the US, but in the entire world. Suffice to say that penguins are definitely illegal to keep as pets in America. What Exotic Pets Are Legal In Maryland Image Credit: Pixabay

Can you have a pet crow in Maryland?

Can You Have a Crow as a Pet? – It’s illegal to own a crow as a pet in the U.S. Crows are covered under the federal Migratory Bird Act of 1918, which makes it not only illegal to own one, but also to hurt one or damage any, except in a few specific circumstances where the crows are causing a hazard to health, property, or an endangered species.

Can you own a marmoset monkey in Maryland?

Maryland – Category: B Summary of Law: No person may possess or breed the following species of animals as a “pet”: foxes, skunks, raccoons, all species of bears, alligators, crocodiles, all species of wild cats, wolves, nonhuman primates, various venomous reptiles, etc.

Can I own a capuchin monkey in MD?

Maryland’s new exotic pets law took effect October 1 Posted on October 02, 2006: Effective Sunday, October 1, it is no longer legal for individuals to import, possess, breed or sell certain dangerous wild animals as pets in Maryland, including lions, tigers, servals, monkeys, wolves, wolf-dog hybrids, alligators and caimans.

  1. Eeping wild animals as pets is dangerous and cruel,” said Beth Preiss, director of the exotic pets campaign for the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).
  2. They can injure and kill; they can spread deadly disease; and the average pet owner cannot provide proper care for them.” The legislation was championed by Del.

Pauline Menes who retired this year after 40 years of service in the House of Delegates. The new rules are aimed at the pet trade and do not apply to legitimate animal sanctuaries, research facilities, or zoos and other exhibitors licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture that operate primarily to display animals.

The complete list of prohibited animals: (1) fox, skunk, raccoon, or bear; (2) caiman, alligator, or crocodile; (3) member of the cat family other than the domestic cat; (4) hybrid of a member of the cat family and a domestic cat if the hybrid weighs over 30 pounds; (5) member of the dog family other than the domestic dog; (6) hybrid of a member of the dog family and a domestic dog; (7) non-human primate, including a lemur, monkey, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, marmoset, loris, or tamarin; or; (8) poisonous snake in the family groups of Hydrophidae, Elapidae, Viperidae, Crotolidae.

: Maryland’s new exotic pets law took effect October 1

Is it legal to keep monkeys at home as pet?

Wildlife Protection Act, 1972. – Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 and Rules made thereunder. Indian Penal Code, 1860. Primates, such as monkeys, might be illegal to keep as pets where you live. And if a monkey is legal to own, permits still might be required.

Sometimes permit holders are subject to home inspections to ensure proper facilities and care are being provided. Moreover, homeowner policies might require additional liability coverage, or some insurance companies might cancel your policy altogether if they find out you have a monkey. However, not having insurance puts you at risk if your monkey bites someone.

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Can you have an otter as a pet in Maryland?

It is illegal in all US States to keep this indigenous otter as a pets.