How Will Hurricane Florence Affect Maryland?

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How Will Hurricane Florence Affect Maryland
How Will Hurricane Florence Affect Maryland? – What could it bring to Maryland? Strong winds heavy rain and flooding and/or storm surge depending on its track. Hurricane Florence’s outer bands could bring some rain to Maryland this weekend and the edges of its wind field could create coastal flooding along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay.
Here’s how Hurricane Florence could affect Maryland: Some coastal flooding, then maybe a surging Susquehanna Hurricane Florence in North Carolina. Could it still bring any hazards to Maryland? The mid-Atlantic will miss the worst of the storm, though some effects were being felt Friday and expected into Saturday. Florence, and a high pressure system over the Northeast, were both bringing an easterly flow into Maryland. That was pushing waters on shore and on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay. A coastal flood advisory is in effect for Anne Arundel and Calvert counties through Saturday evening.

On the Potomac River, a coastal flood warning is in effect for St. Mary’s County, with a coastal flood advisory for Charles County. Florence’s outermost bands could bring periods of heavy rain in Southern Maryland on Friday, but otherwise, as the hurricane moves toward South Carolina and Georgia, the rain threat is expected to diminish by Saturday.

But that risk could increase early next week. The National Hurricane Center predicts Florence will be a post-tropical depression over western Pennsylvania by Tuesday, headed for New England by Wednesday. Depending on how much moisture the system still packs by then, it could bring more heavy rain to a region that has already been soaked and flooded repeatedly this summer.

Dan Hofmann, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Baltimore/Washington forecast office, said downpours are likely along the track of Florence’s remnants — the question is just how far south and east they will extend as what is expected to become a post-tropical depression heads toward New England by the middle of the week.

“There’s still uncertainty in the track itself, and the moisture field is very large,” Hofmann said. “We’re going to be in an environment favorable for heavy rain.” More rain across Pennsylvania could mean another surge of rising waters down the Susquehanna River and into the Chesapeake Bay.

Rising waters from rain earlier this week already forced Exelon Corp. to, causing some flooding around Port Deposit. Similar deluges of fresh water in July and August have sent large amounts of trash and debris down the Susquehanna into the Chesapeake, and pollution they carried, Susquehanna flow hit a record in August, and another round of heavy rain could make an already extreme year on the river even worse.

The highest risks of flooding associated with Florence’s remnants is expected west of the Blue Ridge, in western Virginia and Maryland, the National Weather Service said. “Given how saturated it`s been this summer into early fall, some instances of flooding could be possible,” forecasters wrote.

Will there be rain in Maryland during Hurricane Florence?

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ANNAPOLIS, MD — As Tropical Storm Florence pounds the Carolinas with torrential downpours and strong winds, the weekend weather forecast for Maryland is pretty tame. There is a chance of rain, with cloudy skies and intermittent drizzle through Sunday.

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While the track of Florence is uncertain, forecasters say Maryland could feel the remnants of Florence— in the form of a few inches of rain — Monday or Tuesday. Hurricane Florence packed winds of 90 mph when it made landfall at 7:15 a.m. Friday east of Wilmington, North Carolina. It was downgraded to tropical storm status Friday afternoon and is likely to weaken into a tropical depression Saturday, but officials in the Carolinas warned that the danger was far from over.

At least four people died as a result of the storm by Friday night. Forecasters warned that rainfall could reach up to 40 inches as Florence shifts southwest into South Carolina. ” Florence is forecast to turn westward and then northward through the Carolinas and to the Ohio Valley by Monday,” the National Hurricane Center said in an 11 p.m.

  • Friday advisory.
  • Maryland remains under a state of emergency, and so do the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia.
  • The state of emergency has been lifted in Washington, D.C., and Virginia has rescinded its evacuation order,
  • President Donald Trump declared states of emergency for North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia, paving the way for federal assistance.

All three states have ordered mass evacuations along the coast, and major airlines have issued travel advisories for fliers traveling through numerous airports in the Southeast.

How did Hurricane Florence affect the Carolinas?

This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2018. For other storms of the same name, see Tropical Storm Florence,

Hurricane Florence

Category 4 major hurricane (SSHWS/NWS)
Hurricane Florence near peak intensity south of Bermuda on September 11
Formed August 31, 2018
Dissipated September 18, 2018
( Extratropical after September 17)
Highest winds 1-minute sustained : 150 mph (240 km/h)
Lowest pressure 937 mbar ( hPa ); 27.67 inHg
Fatalities 24 direct, 30 indirect
Damage $24.23 billion (2018 USD )
Areas affected West Africa, Cape Verde, Bermuda, East Coast of the United States (especially the Carolinas ), Atlantic Canada
Part of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season

Hurricane Florence was a powerful and long-lived Cape Verde hurricane that caused catastrophic damage in the Carolinas in September 2018, primarily as a result of freshwater flooding due to torrential rain. The sixth named storm, third hurricane, and the first major hurricane of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season, Florence originated from a strong tropical wave that emerged off the west coast of Africa on August 30, 2018.

The wave steadily organized, and strengthened into a tropical depression on the next day near Cape Verde, Progressing along a steady west-northwest trajectory, the system gradually strengthened, acquiring tropical storm strength on September 1. An unexpected bout of rapid intensification ensued on September 4–5, culminating with Florence becoming a Category 4 major hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson scale (SSHWS), with estimated maximum sustained winds of 130 mph (215 km/h).

Strong wind shear then led to rapid weakening, and Florence weakened to tropical storm strength on September 7. Shifting steering currents led to a westward turn into a more suitable environment; as a result, Florence reintensified to hurricane strength on September 9 and major hurricane status by the following day.

  1. Florence reached peak intensity on September 11, with 1-minute winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 937 mbar (27.7 inHg).
  2. An unexpected eyewall replacement cycle and decreasing oceanic heat content caused a steady weakening trend; however, the storm grew in size at the same time.
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Early on September 14, Florence made landfall in the United States just south of Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane, and weakened further as it slowly moved inland under the influence of weak steering currents. Florence degenerated into a post-tropical cyclone over West Virginia on September 17 and was absorbed by another frontal storm two days later.

  1. Early in the storm’s history, the system brought squalls to the Cape Verde islands, resulting in minor landslides and flooding; however, overall effects remained negligible.
  2. With the threat of a major impact in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic United States becoming evident by September 7, the governors of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Maryland, and the mayor of Washington, D.C.

declared a state of emergency, On September 10 and 11, the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia issued mandatory evacuation orders for some of their coastal communities, predicting that emergency personnel would be unable to reach people there once the storm arrived.

  • Though Florence made landfall as a greatly weakened Category 1 hurricane, winds associated with the tropical cyclone were strong enough to uproot trees and power lines, causing extensive power outages across the Carolinas.
  • Furthermore, due to the slow motion of the storm, heavy rain fell throughout the Carolinas for several days.

Coupled with a powerful storm surge, the rainfall caused widespread flooding along a long stretch of the North Carolina coast, from New Bern to Wilmington, Inland flooding from Florence inundated cities such as Fayetteville, Smithfield, Lumberton, Durham, and Chapel Hill,

Most major roads and highways in the area experienced flooding, with large stretches of I-40, I-95, and US Route 70 remaining impassable for days after the storm’s passage. Wilmington was cut off entirely from the rest of the mainland by the flooding. The storm also spawned tornadoes in several places along its path, including an EF2 tornado that killed one person in Virginia.

Many places received record-breaking rainfall, with Florence setting maximum rainfall records from a tropical cyclone in both of the Carolinas. Overall, the storm caused $24.23 billion in damage, mostly in the Carolinas, and 54 deaths.

What type of Storm is Hurricane Florence?

This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2018. For other storms of the same name, see Tropical Storm Florence,

Hurricane Florence

Category 4 major hurricane (SSHWS/NWS)
Hurricane Florence near peak intensity south of Bermuda on September 11
Formed August 31, 2018
Dissipated September 18, 2018
( Extratropical after September 17)
Highest winds 1-minute sustained : 150 mph (240 km/h)
Lowest pressure 937 mbar ( hPa ); 27.67 inHg
Fatalities 24 direct, 30 indirect
Damage $24.23 billion (2018 USD )
Areas affected West Africa, Cape Verde, Bermuda, East Coast of the United States (especially the Carolinas ), Atlantic Canada
Part of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season

Hurricane Florence was a powerful and long-lived Cape Verde hurricane that caused catastrophic damage in the Carolinas in September 2018, primarily as a result of freshwater flooding due to torrential rain. The sixth named storm, third hurricane, and the first major hurricane of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season, Florence originated from a strong tropical wave that emerged off the west coast of Africa on August 30, 2018.

The wave steadily organized, and strengthened into a tropical depression on the next day near Cape Verde, Progressing along a steady west-northwest trajectory, the system gradually strengthened, acquiring tropical storm strength on September 1. An unexpected bout of rapid intensification ensued on September 4–5, culminating with Florence becoming a Category 4 major hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson scale (SSHWS), with estimated maximum sustained winds of 130 mph (215 km/h).

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Strong wind shear then led to rapid weakening, and Florence weakened to tropical storm strength on September 7. Shifting steering currents led to a westward turn into a more suitable environment; as a result, Florence reintensified to hurricane strength on September 9 and major hurricane status by the following day.

Florence reached peak intensity on September 11, with 1-minute winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 937 mbar (27.7 inHg). An unexpected eyewall replacement cycle and decreasing oceanic heat content caused a steady weakening trend; however, the storm grew in size at the same time.

Early on September 14, Florence made landfall in the United States just south of Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane, and weakened further as it slowly moved inland under the influence of weak steering currents. Florence degenerated into a post-tropical cyclone over West Virginia on September 17 and was absorbed by another frontal storm two days later.

Early in the storm’s history, the system brought squalls to the Cape Verde islands, resulting in minor landslides and flooding; however, overall effects remained negligible. With the threat of a major impact in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic United States becoming evident by September 7, the governors of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Maryland, and the mayor of Washington, D.C.

declared a state of emergency, On September 10 and 11, the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia issued mandatory evacuation orders for some of their coastal communities, predicting that emergency personnel would be unable to reach people there once the storm arrived.

Though Florence made landfall as a greatly weakened Category 1 hurricane, winds associated with the tropical cyclone were strong enough to uproot trees and power lines, causing extensive power outages across the Carolinas. Furthermore, due to the slow motion of the storm, heavy rain fell throughout the Carolinas for several days.

Coupled with a powerful storm surge, the rainfall caused widespread flooding along a long stretch of the North Carolina coast, from New Bern to Wilmington, Inland flooding from Florence inundated cities such as Fayetteville, Smithfield, Lumberton, Durham, and Chapel Hill,

  1. Most major roads and highways in the area experienced flooding, with large stretches of I-40, I-95, and US Route 70 remaining impassable for days after the storm’s passage.
  2. Wilmington was cut off entirely from the rest of the mainland by the flooding.
  3. The storm also spawned tornadoes in several places along its path, including an EF2 tornado that killed one person in Virginia.

Many places received record-breaking rainfall, with Florence setting maximum rainfall records from a tropical cyclone in both of the Carolinas. Overall, the storm caused $24.23 billion in damage, mostly in the Carolinas, and 54 deaths.

How fast did Hurricane Florence move forward?

Hurricane Florence. This led to Florence moving forward at only 2–3 miles per hour (3.2–4.8 km/h); the storm continually dumped heavy rain along coastal areas from September 13, when the outer rain bands first began to be felt, to September 15, when the storm was still stalled out only a few miles west of Wilmington.