How Is A Maryland Bridge Held In Place?

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How Is A Maryland Bridge Held In Place
Maryland or resin-bonded bridges – A Maryland bridge is referred to as a more conservative type of dental bridge because it does not require the removal of enamel from abutment teeth to make room for dental crowns. Maryland bridges aren’t held in place by crowns.

Instead, the metal or porcelain framework that holds your pontics in place is bonded with resin to the back of your natural teeth on either side of your missing teeth. A resin-bonded bridge offers the advantage of not requiring any modification to the abutment teeth, but isn’t appropriate for molars or other teeth exposed to high biting force.

Maryland bridges are most commonly used in the front of your jaw.

What is a Maryland Bridge and how does it work?

Maryland Bridge, also known as an adhesive bridge or a resin-bonded bridge, is an effective process to restore an individual’s smile and self-confidence by and replacing a missing tooth or a set of teeth. A Maryland dental bridge not only restores the gap which has been created by a missing tooth or a set of teeth but also restores the lost functionality. How Is A Maryland Bridge Held In Place A Maryland bridge is a concoction consisting of artificial porcelain teeth, known as pontics, which are baked onto a metallic structure attached with wings which contain porosities onto their inner surfaces. These are then meant to be affixed with the assistance of adhesive dental cement to the adjacent natural teeth on either posterior sides of the gap where the artificial tooth is to be placed.

  • Formerly, the framework and the wings on a Maryland bridge was only prepared with a metal structure.
  • Whereas, now, individuals have the choice of selecting from either zirconia or reinforced porcelain material to be used in the framework of the Maryland bridge.
  • Both of which provide visually appealing and desirable results.
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The Maryland dental bridge is mainly feasible to use in the frontal teeth area because its capacity to staying intact is limited to the resin being used to be fixed to the adjacent teeth on either side. As, if it is used in the molar region, which is subject to biting strongly with force, there are chances of it falling off.

  • For this reason, Maryland dental bridges are more commonly used in the front teeth region where lost teeth are required to be placed.
  • The Maryland dental bridge can be used as a temporary or permanent fix as a tooth replacement option.
  • Patients waiting on implants can also consider this option as a temporary solution before getting implants.

It also requires very nominal preparation on its adjacent teeth as the Maryland dental bridge procedure includes re-contouring, which also removes a portion of the enamel of the teeth. After which a teeth impression is made from conferring to which a temporary bridge is made to keep infection at bay.

Is a Maryland Bridge right for me?

Cons of Maryland Bridges: –

  • Maryland bridges may not be feasible for all teeth (such as molars in the back of the mouth)
  • Maryland bridges may need to be rebonded every five to eight years
  • The bonding on Maryland bridge wings may cause adjacent teeth to darken (teeth whitening may be an option to combat this)
  • Bridges can cause tooth decay if they’re not cleaned properly
  • The artificial tooth may not perfectly match your natural teeth
  • You are only a good candidate with good oral hygiene and no tooth decay
  • It is not recommended to get a Maryland bridge if you are missing more than two teeth
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Summary Getting a Maryland bridge is non-invasive, low-risk, quick, instant, cost-effective, long-lasting, and doesn’t require enamel removal. However, it may cause teeth darkening and tooth decay, and it needs frequent rebonding (every five to eight years).

What are the steps of the Maryland Bridge procedure?

Maryland Bridge Procedure Steps – The implant procedure to place a Maryland bridge is simple. It is a generally quick and non-invasive procedure that shouldn’t require too many trips to the dentist’s office.

  1. Your dentist will lightly etch the back of your adjacent teeth to help the bonding surface
  2. Your dentist will apply a bonding resin to the back of each adjacent tooth
  3. Your dentist will place the bridge’s metal wings to the bonding resin on the back of each tooth, fitting the new tooth in the gap
  4. Your dentist will cure the resin to secure the dental bridge in place

Can you get a Maryland Bridge with two teeth?

Cons of Maryland Bridges: –

  • Maryland bridges may not be feasible for all teeth (such as molars in the back of the mouth)
  • Maryland bridges may need to be rebonded every five to eight years
  • The bonding on Maryland bridge wings may cause adjacent teeth to darken (teeth whitening may be an option to combat this)
  • Bridges can cause tooth decay if they’re not cleaned properly
  • The artificial tooth may not perfectly match your natural teeth
  • You are only a good candidate with good oral hygiene and no tooth decay
  • It is not recommended to get a Maryland bridge if you are missing more than two teeth
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Summary Getting a Maryland bridge is non-invasive, low-risk, quick, instant, cost-effective, long-lasting, and doesn’t require enamel removal. However, it may cause teeth darkening and tooth decay, and it needs frequent rebonding (every five to eight years).